War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0127 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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Ferry below. You will also turn over the work of building the trestle bridge at Phillips' entirely to the Army of the Ohio, or rather to Captain Twining, who commands the engineers of the Twenty-third Corps, and as soon as it is completed you will move your bridge, now at that place, and throw it across the river near the other at Pace's Ferry.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Near Vining's Station, Ga., July 12, 1864.

(Received 1 p. m.)

Major General O. O. HOWARD,

Commanding Fourth Army Corps:

GENERAL: General Sherman has ordered Captain Kossak to go with his pontoon to the saw-mill at Rottenwood, which is only a mile back of Powers' Ferry. You will use this bridge instead of Colonel Buell's. If Colonel Buell has a bridge down at Powers' Ferry, relieve it so soon as the trestle is completed at Phillips'. Order Colonel Bueell to bridge Pace's.

By command of Major-General Thomas:

SOUTHARD HOFFMAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

In the Field, July 12, 1864.

Major General J. M. PALMER,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding the department desires that you will make an explanation upon the following subject, thinking there must have been some mistake or misunderstanding: Last evening General Thomas directed General Brannan to cause artillery to be placed in the redoubts abandoned by the enemy near the railroad bridge over the Chattahoochee, for the purpose of firing upon the enemy's works upon the opposite side of the river. General Brannan communicated the order to Major Houghtaling, your chief of artillery, but for some reason the artillery was not placed in the position ordered, or anywhere else. The reason alleged by Major Houghtaling is that you countermanded the order of the major-general commanding, saying that if General Thomas had any order of the kind to communicate he could do so in writing. There was perhaps some misunderstanding.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Chattahoochee, July 12, 1864-2 a. m.

Major-General McPHERSON,

Commanding Army of the Tennessee:

GENERAL: I have received your dispatches of last night. You may put in motion at once the Fifteenth Corps and trains for Roswell, leaving General Blair with such artillery and wagons as he may need to