War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0119 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

Search Civil War Official Records

HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, SIXTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Roswell, July 11, 1864.

Major General W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding:

All quiet this morning. I had no fear about being able to build the bridge, but thought you might expect it finished sooner than possible, as it was twice as long as I expected to find it, and twice as long as the river is wide down at Sandtown. I have over 1,000 men at work on it day and night, and it is already well under way. I have planking for floor now on the ground, and not one minute shall be lost in pushing it forward. Every man that can work on it shall be kept at it. Reports here show no force of the enemy's infantry this side of Peach Tree. Wheeler's cavalry advance is at Buck Head, with all of his force south of there. Last night Joe Johnston's headquarters were three miles this side of Atlanta on the railroad. Atlanta papers of the 10th instant say that at a council of war held that day it was decided to fight for Atlanta. All trains of the enemy are reported by citizens and deserters to have gone toward Augusta, and a general refuging is going on among the wealthy citizens.

G. M. DODGE,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Chattahoochee River, July 11, 1864.

General DODGE,

Roswell:

Your dispatch is received. Send me any Atlanta papers you get. I have no doubt you will have the bridge done in time. As soon as you can spare General Newton he should be relieved to join his corps where his camp equipage is. I rode along the river-bank to-day, and the force of the enemy seemed to be merely sharpshooters in small numbers in their forts. All well with us.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Chattahoochee River, July 11, 1864.

General GARRARD,

Roswell:

Certainly, by all means save the bridge above Roswell, and get me information of the lay of the country from it toward Stone Mountain.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

ROSWELL, July 11, 1864-8 p. m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

I have nothing new to report. All is quiet to-day. Parties have been in every direction and no evidence of any considerable force on this side of the river.

Very respectfully,

K. GARRARD,

Brigadier-General.