War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0111 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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can be sent down to-morrow. The infantry are to guard the line of the river down as far as the mouth of Sweet Water Creek until the return of the cavalry expedition.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Near Chattahoochee River, July 10, 1864.

Brigadier General W. Q. GRESHAM,

Commanding Fourth Division:

GENERAL: I am directed to inform you that one brigade of the Third Division has been sent off to the extreme right to guard fords, &c. Should any attack be made on General Leggett, the major-general commanding desires you to hold a portion of your command in readiness to assist him if necessary.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

[A. J. ALEXANDER,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ROSWELL, July 10, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Your dispatch in regard to the reported force near Acworth has just been received. Communications, except by telegraph to Marietta, come very late; those by telegraph and my courier line in two hours. I will make full investigation to-day in regard to what force the enemy have north of the river. They come over in small parties, scatter, and then concentrate at some point inside our lines, and it is difficult to catch them, but I will take such precautions that no large organized force can get far without my knowledge. All is quiet, and I have directed my pickets south of the river to advance on the Atlanta road, if possible.

K. GARRARD,

Brigadier-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Chattahoochee, July 10, 1864.

General GARRARD,

Roswell:

Signal officer reports the railroad and wagon road bridges burning. If this be so, of course the enemy is on the other side. The truth will be ascertained at once. In the mean time be watchful.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS,

Roswell, July 10, 1864.

Major-General SHERMAN:

To-day I have sent patrols toward Canton, Loring's, Goodbridge, Cumming, and up the river, and I can learn of no large force of cavalry on this side of the river. There are small parties of five to ten scattered through the country, but no organized force. As well as I can