War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0071 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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The country, with the exception of a skirt on the river and creek, is densely timbered and quite broken. Please transmit the information herein contained, or such portion as may be interesting to know, to General Sherman, as he desired me to keep him informed and advised.

Respectfully, &c.,

STONEMAN,

General.

I sleep to-night on the Sandtown road between the forks of the Howell's Ferry road and the old Alabama road, just in advance of where I was last night. I will try and see you in the morning.

G. S.

(Forwarded to General Sherman.)

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, Chattahoochee River, July 6, 1864.

General ROUSSEAU,

Nashville and Decatur:

That cavalry expedition must now be off, and must proceed with the utmost energy and confidence. Everything here is favorable, and I have official information that General A. J. Smith is out from Memphis with force enough to give Forrest full occupation. Expeditions inland are also out from Vicksburg and Baton Rouge, as well as against Mobile. If managed with secrecy and rapidity the expedition cannot fail of success and will accomplish much good.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

CHATTAHOOCHEE, July 6, 1864.

Major General L. H. ROUSSEAU,

Nashville:

Has that expedition started?

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.

DALTON, July 6, 1864.

Major-General STEEDMAN,

Commanding:

I have received information that rebel cavalry, in a line that took one hour in passing, went by Mr. Holland's house in the bend of Connesauga River, six miles southeast from here.

B. LAIBOLDT,

Colonel, Commanding Post.

DALTON, July 6, 1864.

Major-General STEEDMAN:

The same party of raiders that burned the train yesterday are reported to be from 300 to 500 strong at the bend of Connesauga River,