War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0027 Chapter L. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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manding officers to communicate frequently between posts. By applying to Colonel Lowe, commanding cavalry division, at these headquarters, you will be furnished with the necessary transportation and guides for the disposition of your command. After having examined the line placed under your command with a view to a complete guard of the river, and the most suitable location for brigade headquarters, you will report to the general commanding, when the detachment of the Tenth Iowa will be assigned to duty on the same line.

By order of Brigadier General John E. Smith:

CARL. L. WHITE,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

ACWORTH, July 2, 1864.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI:

A company, undoubtedly fifty strong, of rebel guerrilla cavalry, approached this post from northwest, two roads, to within two miles of this place, and three-quarters of a mile of the first railroad bridge northerly, capturing about 5 stragglers from the dismounted cavalry, left here by Colonel Dorr's brigade, and, as is said, a major of Tennessee cavalry. One of Mr. Rossell's construction corps was captured and robbed. He afterward escaped when our men approached and drove off the rebels. I sent three companies in pursuit, but being dismounted accomplished only the driving them off and examining the road and bridge. I ave sent one company to the bridge to remain until further orders. The railroad is undisturbed. I have frequently before heard or rebel cavalry having been seen and heard of from three to eight miles northwest from here.

SAMUEL ROSS,

Colonel Twentieth Connecticut Vol. Infantry, Commanding Post.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

In the Field, July 2, 1864.

Colonel SAMUEL ROSS,

Acworth:

Your dispatch to assistant adjutant-general, headquarters military division, received and referred here where it should have been sent. Occurrences like that your report are to be expected. You must guard your post and see that they do not destroy the railroad in your vicinity. If those guerrillas ever fall into your hands take no prisoners.

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Chief of Staff.

GENERAL THOMAS' HEADQUARTERS,

Near Marietta, Ga., July 2, 1864-11.30 p.m.

Major THOMAS T. ECKERT,

Assistant Superintendent U. S. Military Telegraph;

Movement to turn Johnston's position made progress to-day, General Schofield getting in position better than was expected, and McPherson being ready to move at dark, when absence of enemy from