War of the Rebellion: Serial 076 Page 0020 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

In the Field, July 2, 1864-4.30 a.m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Yes. All right, so far. No indications of an attack yet.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Kenesaw, July 2, 1864.

General SCHOFIELD:

General McPherson reports he will be ready to move to-night. Are you ready for him to uncover the railroad? Telegraph me any news on your flank, especially what Stoneman is about. Has General Morgan L. Smith's division come to you yet? I will move my headquarters to-morrow to Cheney's.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE OHIO,

July 2, 1864-7.30 a.m.

Major-General SHERMAN:

Smith's division is here. I will put in position on the Ruff's Mill and Sandtown road on which McPherson is to move while I will hold the Marietta road an from there back to Olley's Creek.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

In the Field, near Kenesaw, July 2, 1864.

General SCHOFIELD,

General McPherson is now moving out. General Garrard will cover the depot; but one of the greatest probabilities is that Wheeler's cavalry will, the moment the disposition of the infantry is discovered, sweep round the flank of the cavalry and try to capture our depot, which should be cleared out to-night or very early in the morning. All were so instructed this morning.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General. Commanding.

JULY 2, 1864.

General SCHOFIELD:

As your command will not probably move from the present position, you had better, unload all wagons and send and bring something in the nature of provisions from the depot to-night. I understand there is an excess of sugar, coffee, and salt. These, with beef, are batter than nothing. It may be you can also procure the full measure of bread. At all events, haul to Wade's all you can to-day and to-night, emptying your wagons, where they now are, on the ground.

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General.