War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0967 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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tired, as the command has been marching and fighting for several days. We have lost some of the most valuable officers in our command. I don't think the enemy can possibly march to Talladega before the 5th of next month. If they are moving in that direction they have not gone far enough for me to determine to what place they are destined.

For further particulars I will refer you to Lieutenant Ruther, who will hand you this communication.

I am, yours, &c.,

JOSIAH PATTERSON,

Colonel, Commanding.

COMMANDING OFFICER,

Talladega, Ala.

Numbers 718.

Report of Captain Thomas J. Key, Arkansas Artillery, commanding Hotchkiss' artillery battalion, of operations July 22.

HEADQUARTERS HOTCHKISS' BATTALION,

July 23, 1864.

About noon I moved Captain Goldthwaite's battery immediately in rear of General Govan's brigade, and so soon as the line of the enemy was known I ordered it into battery, engaging their battery and works. Captain Goldthwaite had 2 men wounded (James Wilhorn slightly and S. b. Wilder severely) and 4 horses disabled. The loss of Captain Turner's battery consisted in killing of 1 horse and 4 wounded.

All of which I respectfully submit.

THOS J. KEY,

Captain, Commanding Battalion.

Captain BUCK.

Numbers 719.

Report of Lieutenant Richard L. Watkins, Lookout (Tennessee) Artillery, of operations July 20.

HEADQUARTERS BARRY'S BATTERY,

September 14, 1864.

In compliance with circular order of this date I have the honor to submit the following report of the part this battery acted in the engagement on Peach Tree Creek July 20:

Was ordered to relieve Captain Selden's battery at about 4 p. m. Went into the action on the left of Pace's Ferry road on General Walthall's line under galling fire from 4-gun battery in front, and an enfilading fire from battery on our right, and within easy range of sharpshooters. We immediately opened with all our guns on battery in front (our battery being a four Napoleon gun battery). After a rapid, and, as I learned from skirmishers, effective fire from our battery for thirty minutes the battery in front almost ceased to