War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0810 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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of battle on a ridge immediately east of the town. Breast-works were commenced late in the afternoon and completed after night. Before day, however, we withdrew from the position and took the route to Cartersville.

In the afternoon (20th) we crossed the Etowah, and camped near Allatoona Station.

During the series of marched from Dalton to this point the men, though daily much fatigued, kept well together, and there was little or no straggling.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL BENTON,

Colonel, Commanding.

Captain E. T. SYKES,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Numbers 652.

Report of Captain T. S. Hubbard, Thirty-fourth Mississippi Infantry, of operations July 28.

HDQRS. THIRTY-FOURTH MISSISSIPPI REGIMENT,

July 31, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following as a report of the part my command took in the engagement of the 28th instant:

The line was ordered forward about 12 m. I was ordered at the same time to conform my movements to the troops on my right, which I did. The command advanced about 300 yards, when we were halted. We remained there about fifteen minutes, when we were ordered forward again. Soon afterward we engaged the enemy and drove them about half a mile, when we came up to some temporary works built by the enemy. There the fighting was desperate for about ten or fifteen minutes, after which the troops were drawn off on the right. I then drew my regiment off about 300 yards in good order, after which the line was reformed and ordered forward again. We engaged the enemy, holding our position until ordered to the right in rear of General Walthall's division.

That the meritorious may receive just praise, I deem it proper to mention an instance of gallantry displayed by Sergt. Andrew J. Hamilton, Company D, of this regiment. When the enemy's temporary works were taken, it was ascertained that the enemy were only about fifty yards beyond. Sergeant Hamilton advanced some distance in front of the line, until he found himself in a few steps of the enemy's line. He halted and fired several shots into their ranks, killing an officer, who was in advance trying to rally his men.

In advancing on the enemy both officers and men behaved very gallantly, showing that calmness which they have so often displayed on many other hotly-contested battle-fields.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. S. HUBBARD,

Captain, Commanding.

Captain J. C. HARRISON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.