War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0783 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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ADDENDA.

Return of casualties in Manigault's brigade in the engagement at Ezra Church on July 28.

[Compiled from nominal lists of casualties.]

Killed Wounded

Command Officers Men Officers Men

24th Alabama ....... 2 2 12

28th Alabama 2 2 4 20

34th Alabama ....... 14 3 43

19th South Carolina 2 7 7 27

Total 4 25 16 102

Captured or missing

Command Officers Men Aggregate

24th Alabama 1 3 20

28th Alabama ....... 2 30

34th Alabama ....... 9 69

19th South Carolina ....... 8 51

Total 1 22 170

Numbers 635.

Report of Captain Starke H. Oliver, Twenty-fourth Alabama Infantry, of operations July 28.

CAMP TWENTY-FOURTH ALABAMA REGIMENT,

Near Atlanta, August 2, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: In compliance with circular issued from brigade headquarters, July 30, 1864, I have the honor to submit the following as a report of the part taken by the Twenty-fourth Alabama Regiment in the action of the 28th instant:

Colonel N. N. Davis having been appointed division officer of the day, the command of the regiment devolved upon me as senior captain. The position occupied by the regiment that morning was the center of the brigade, then bivouacked on the West Point railroad about two miles and a half from Atlanta. About 12 or 1 o'clock I received orders to move "left in front" on the Baker's Ferry road. The regiment moved with the brigade near the Poor-House on said road. When near the Poor-House the brigade moved to the left behind a skirt of woods and formed line of battle, as I understood, for the purpose of supporting Deas' brigade. In a short time the command was given to move forward, "guide left." After advancing some distance the brigade halted and corrected the alignment. The command was again given to forward, when the regiment moved forward with the brigade, moving through an open field, encountering the enemy on the opposite side of the field, strongly fortified upon the crest of a hill. The regiment charged within thirty or forty steps of the enemy' fortifications under a severe fire. At this point the regiment being under enfilade fire from the right, and being informed by the commander of regiment on my left that the left had fallen back, and seeing the enemy advancing upon my right flank, the regiment gave way and fell back about 200 or 300 yards in confusion. Here the regiment reformed, together with the brigade, when the command was again given to move forward and occupy the crest of a small eminence in front of the enemy's works and pile up rails as a temporary protection. Here we remained until relieved by another brigade, when we moved up the Baker's Ferry road by the right flank, moving