War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0754 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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ported, and that the enemy were flanking us in force upon the right, which was done without loss, forming as a reserve to General Govan's brigade, still farther to the rear, in a line of works captured from the enemy by them.

In the engagement of the 22nd instant our loss was 4 killed, 21 wounded, 3 captured.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. A. TAYLOR,

Major Twenty-fourth Texas Cav. (dismounted), Commanding

Lieutenant S. G. SNEED,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

Numbers 622.

Report of Lieutenant Colonel Cincinnatus S. Guyton, Fifty-seventh Georgia Infantry, commanding Mercer's brigade, of operations July 22-24.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report through you to the major-general commanding that about 5 p. m. on the 22nd of July the brigade (Lieutenant-Colonel Rawls, Fifty-fourth Georgia commanding), under the direction of Brigadier-General Lowrey, moved by the left flank to a point near to and southwest of the Fair Ground road, and distant from Atlanta two miles and a half, opposite the works then occupied by the enemy. From this position we assaulted the enemy's works, carrying two lines. In the assault on the second line Lieutenant-Colonel Rawls was wounded and carried from the field, when the command devolved on myself. The enemy was at this time occupying a third line of works distant from the line occupied by us about thirty paces, both sides firing rapidly. The brigade was in the utmost state of confusion as regarded its organization, the regiments being intermingled with each other and the right of Maney's brigade. On assuming command, I immediately ordered an advance, but the men could be induced to go no farther, which I think was owing in part, if not altogether, to want of organization, officers being unable to form their commands under so close and deadly fire. About 9 p. m. I reported, through Captain Gordon, assistant inspector-general, of Brigadier-General Mercer's staff, the condition of affairs to Brigadier-General Lowrey and asked for instructions, and was ordered to hold the position, which was done until 3 a. m. on 23d, when orders were received from Brigadier-General Mercer to withdraw and report to him at his headquarters. This was accomplished in tolerably good order.

The casualties of the day, ending 3 a. m. 23d, were 30 killed, 129 wounded, and 20 missing.

July 23, at 5 a. m. the brigade moved in position on the line to the right of Major-General Cleburne's division and commenced to intrench. July 24, the brigade was engaged in strengthening its position and policing the ground. Colonel Berkeley, Fifty-seventh Georgia, reported and assumed command.

During my temporary command I found the assistance rendered by Captains Mercer and Gordon, of Brigadier-General Mercer's staff, of great service, and I cannot speak in terms too highly of their gallant conduct on 22d.

I am, captain, with much respect, your obedient servant,

C. S. GUYTON,

Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

Captain BUCK, Assistant Adjutant-General.