War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0598 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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command was driving the enemy to and across Nickajack Creek, and 22nd of July he was severely wounded while bravely doing his duty.

Sergt. Major John G. Safley, Eleventh Iowa Volunteers, in the action of 22nd of July, collected together thirty or forty men, made a dash over the works then held by the enemy, capturing and bringing over with them as many prisoners as they numbered, amongst whom were a colonel and a captain. Safley was wounded in the attack, but came back with his party and sent the prisoners to the rear and remained with the regiment until the action was over.

Lieutenant Colonel John M. Hedrick, Fifteenth Iowa Volunteers, for marked gallantry in the actions of the 4th, 5th, 21st, and 22nd of July. He also commanded the skirmishers during the actions of the 4th and 5th of July, while this brigade was advancing on Nickajack Creek, and on the 22nd of July, while encouraging the men by word and example, he was severely wounded in the arm and hip and carried off the field.

Sergt. William L. Watson, Company I, Fifteenth Iowa Volunteers, for meritorious conduct in the advance on Nickajack Creek and for conspicuous gallantry in the actions of 22nd and 28th of July.

Private Nathan S. Hayes, Company G, Fifteenth Iowa Volunteers, for special gallantry on the 22nd of July. Being in charge of a wagon belonging to these headquarters he, with the wagon, was captured by two rebels. Watching his opportunity, he attacked his guard with a revolver which he had kept concealed, overpowered one of them and brought him into camp, the other guard making his escape.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. W. BELKNAP,

Brigadier-General.

Captain ADDISON WARE, Jr.,

Asst. Adjt. General, Fourth Division, 17th Army Corps.

HDQRS. THIRD Brigadier, FOURTH DIV., 17TH ARMY CORPS,

Near Atlanta, Ga., September 11, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of this brigade since the date of my assuming command (July 31, 1864):

The brigade was at that date in position near Ezra Church, three regiments (the Eleventh, Sixteenth, and Thirteenth Iowa) being in front and one (the Fifteenth Iowa) in reserve. Remained there until August 9, when the Fifteenth and Eleventh Iowa were moved to the front and the Sixteenth and Thirteenth Iowa placed in reserve. August 11, the Fifteenth Iowa was moved to the right of the Eleventh Iowa, being on the left of the First Brigade. August 23, the Eleventh Iowa was advanced to new line with the Sixteenth and Thirteenth Iowa on its right, the Fifteenth Iowa being in reserve on the old line. August 26, the command was placed in new line, formed for the purpose of withdrawing the army. The brigade moved at 8 o'clock that night, being the advance of the division; reached the Montgomery, railroad near Fairburn at 1 p. m. of the 28th; threw up works along the railroad, placing the Eleventh, Thirteenth, and Fifteenth Iowa in front, and the Sixteenth Iowa in reserve. On the same evening and on the 29th effectually destroyed the railroad in the rear of the command, and on the latter date sent the reserve regiment to destroy the railroad on the right of the Third