War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0557 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.--ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE.

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III. Sergt. Russell Bethel, Company C, Seventy-eighth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, was awarded a gold medal of honor for having gallantly borne and defended the colors of his regiment during the battle of July 22, 1864.

When the enemy closed up to his regiment and attempted to wrest the colors from him, he knocked the rebel who grasped the standard down with his first, and remained in the front of his regiment, flying his colors, until the enemy was repulsed.

IV. Sergt. James R. Earich, E Company, Seventy-eighth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, was awarded a silver medal of honor for gallantry and devotion to his colors in the battle of July 22, 1864.

When the color bearer of his regiment was shot down, he grasped the colors, carried them to the front, where he remained with them until severely wounded.

V. Private George W. White, C Company, Thirty-first Illinois Veteran Volunteer Infantry, was awarded a silver medal of honor for gallant conduct in the battle of July 22, 1864. Having been severely wounded in the head, Private White refused to be carried to the rear, saying that he would not leave his flag as long as there was a man left in the regiment, and that he would fight as long as he could pull a trigger. He remained with his regiment, regardless of personal suffering, until the battle was over.

VI. Private Thomas Yates, E Company, Thirty-first Illinois Veteran Volunteer Infantry, was awarded a gold medal of honor for having bravely defended the colors of his regiment during the battle of the 22nd of July, 1864.

When the enemy attempted to wrest the colors from the bearer, Private Yates shot dead the first man who laid his hand upon the standard, knocked the next one down with the butt of his musket; remained by and gallantly defended his colors until they were out of danger.

VII. First Lieutenant Edmund E. Nutt, Twentieth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, was awarded a silver medal of honor for conspicuous bravery and good conduct in the battle of July 22, 1864, where he led two charges against the enemy, driving them each time, and when our right was forced back, he remained on the Bald Hill rallying stragglers and fighting these disorganized troops bravely until midnight, when he was relieved.

VIII. Private Charles Stevenson, Twentieth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, was awarded a gold medal of honor for special and distinguished gallantry in the battle of July 22, 1864.

Whilst fighting hand-to-hand over the works, this soldier caught the colors of the Seventy-eighth Ohio Infantry from the bearer, who was shot, planted them on the parapet, and defended them until taken charge of by another of the color guard. He was shortly afterward hauled over the works and taken prisoner, and while in the hands of the enemy, seized a rebel flag and tore it into pieces; was recaptured, and almost immediately after knocked senseless by a piece of shell. Upon his recovery, he resumed his musket, though suffering severely, and fought with the utmost gallantry the remainder of the day.

IX. Private Wilbur Blackburn, Twentieth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, was awarded a silver medal of honor for his daring and courage on the 22nd of July, 1864.

When his regiment had exhausted their ammunition he volunteered to go out between the conflicting lines and bring a box of