War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0498 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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mishing, building light works at each successive advance. The position here was particularly dangerous on account of the proximity of the lines, and many valuable men were lost. Upon the 19th, the enemy having evacuated their formidable works in our front, we advanced with the expectation of reaching Marietta, but found that the rebel lines, established upon the crest of Kenesaw, were too strong to be carried by assault. Upon the 21st moved with the brigade to the foot of Kenesaw and threw up works during the night. In this position the regiment remained until the 3rd of July, when, the enemy having evacuated their works during the night, it moved to the right and camped near Nickajack Creek. Upon the morning of the 4th moved forward to the ridge upon the other side of Nickajack, and after forming in column of companies in rear of the Thirty-ninth Ohio Infantry, advanced and drove the enemy into their works. During the day threw up a line of works, and when just before dark a charge was made by the Thirty-ninth and Twenty-seventh Ohio Regiments of Infantry, which resulted in the capture of the enemy's works, this regiment remained in reserve as a support in case the assault should be unsuccessful. Upon the morning of the 5th, the enemy having again retired, moved still farther to the right, and on the night of the 7th threw up a line of rifle-pits upon the north bank of the Chattahoochee, within less than 100 yards of the rebel works at a point called Howell's Ferry, Here we remained until the morning of the 9th, when we received ordered orders to march to Roswell via Marietta, arriving at that point, fording the river, and going into camp about dark. Remained quiet in camp until the 17th of July, the command being occupied in resting, washing, and receiving supplies. At this point blackberries and apples were found very abundant, and to this fact the improved condition of the command upon marching was mainly owing. Upon the 17th of July marched in accordance with orders received the night before to Decatur on the Georgia Railroad, skirmishing with the enemy at Nancy's Creek on the 17th, and camping on Peach Tree Creek on the 8th. Reached Decatur on the 19th, and were under fire of the enemy's artillery just before going into camp. Marched a point near Atlanta on the 20th and camped. On the 21st moved up in rear of the Seventeenth Army Corps, and in obedience to orders received reported to Brigadier-General Force, commanding a brigade of General Legget's division. Here we remained until the afternoon of the 22d, when we rejoined the brigade, and took part in the action of that date, for detailed report of which attention is called to my special report of July 26.* After the conclusion of the action we fortified the position assigned to the regiment, and remained in camp until midnight of the 26th, when a movement was commenced, which the next day brought the command upon the extreme right of the army. On the morning of the 28th advanced the skirmish line in obedience to orders received, and remained on the line during the battle of that day, nothing more serious than demonstrations being made on our front. In the afternoon, however, we were exposed to a severe fire from the enemy's artillery. From this time until the 18th of August the regiment took part in all the advances which were made upon the enemy's works, and performed its share of skirmish duty, being constantly exposed to the fire of the enemy's artillery, as well as sharpshooters. A subsequent examination shows that our sharpshooters must have inflicted serious

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* See p. 496.

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