War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0412 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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of the corps commander I ordered two regiments from Rice's brigade to report to General Kilpatrick, as he said, to support his cavalry, but really to do the work the cavalry should have done. They were kept in advance of the main body of the cavalry, carrying four days' rations, pioneer tools, knapsacks, guns, and equipments, and compelled to march rapidly to keep up, under an August sun in Georgia. The cavalry, not being able to dislodge, with their few troops in advance, the enemy, who had covered himself with rails and dirt on an eminence overlooking the surrounding country, withdrew, and sent the infantry in. Major Hamill, of the Second Iowa Infantry, commanding both regiments (the Seventh Iowa and his own), deployed the Second and, placing the Seventh in support, charged the works through a corn-field, driving the rebels from their position, killing and wounding, but no capturing any. Major Hamill, in this gallant affair, received a serious wound, and was borne to the rear. His loss was 8 or 9 killed and wounded.

The morning of the 31st of August found us bivouacked on the west bank of the Flint River, about two miles from Jonesborough, Rice's brigade in line, facing south, Adams' brigade i rear of department headquarters, facing north. The Fifteenth Corps had crossed the river the evening previous, and gone into line of battle, facing east, with their flanks well refused. After throwing up a strong line on the west bank of the stream and building two brigades, I was directed by Major-General Howard, through General Ransom, to send Adams' brigade, which had just been relieved by the Seventeenth Corps, across the river to occupy the line of works General Osterhaus' right brigade were then in; Colonel Adams occupying the position designated by General Howard, relieving two or moe regiments of General Osterhaus' division. About 10 a. m. Battery H, First Missouri Light Artillery, Lieutenant Blodgett commanding, was placed on the right of Adams' brigade, without any protection. The distance from the battery to the river was about 1,000 yards, which, by order of General Howard, was to be left open for the enemy to come in. In the course of the morning I received another order to throw General Rice's brigade across the river in reserve. This was done at 1 p. m. The line of the Fifteenth Corps, as before observed, was due north and south, facing east. The left of this division connected with the right of the Fifteenth Corps, but at right angles with that line; consequently, we faces due south, our right projecting into air. The line we occupied was on a ridge with a corn-field in front, a ravine intervening, the whole composing the eastern water-shed of the Flint, which drained the fields toward our right. Along the edge of the river in the bottom the woods are quite dense, and furnish excellent cover for infantry. Six hundred yards in our front another strip of timber parallel to our line, along the farther edge of the corn-field. The line we occupied was on a ridge with a corn-field in front, a ravine intervening, the whole composing the eastern water-shed of the Flint, which drained the fields toward our right. Along the edge of the river in the bottom the woods are quite dense, and furnish excellent cover for infantry. Six hundred yards in our front another strip of timber parallel to our line, along the farther edge of the corn-field. At 2 p. m. our skirmishers were pushed in, followed by a line of battle, which emerged from the strip of forest opposite, and came out obliquely to our line into the corn-field. Adams' brigade, with Blodgett's battery, sent them back. Rice's brigade was now double-quicked to the right of the battery, to continue the line if possible to the river. Again the enemy charged, advancing squarely with our works. The battery, exposed to the pattering fire, stood out in open field, sending case and solid shot, without marked effect, and the lines advanced through the corn-field steadily, their floating in the lazy breeze. A few