War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0406 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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pelled to halt on the side of the mountain, in consequence of the skirmish line of the Seventeenth Army Corps being driven back, leaving the left flank of the Sixty-sixth Illinois Volunteers exposed to a flank fire from the enemy, and making it necessary to throw one company across the flank thus uncovered for its protection. The Ninth Illinois Volunteers, having been dismounted temporarily, were thrown forward during the night as a support to the skirmish line.

During the 28th, 29th, and 30th of June and 1st of July the general position of the troops of this command remained unchanged, and no demonstration being made on either side in our immediate front, except the usual and constant skirmishing. At 10 p. m. July 2 the command moved, in compliance with orders from headquarters Department and Army of the Tennessee, to a position one mile and a half to the right and rear, remaining in line of battle until the morning of July 3, at which time it was ascertained that the enemy had evacuated Kenesaw Mountain. At 7 a. m. of this date the division was again put in motion, passing down the Sandtown road past the Twenty-third Army Corps, then bearing to the left toward Ruff's Mill, on Nickajack Creek, which was reached about 7 p. m., and, in compliance with instructions, relieved a division of troops found stationed at this point. During the night works were thrown up for the batteries and rifle-pits for the men, and occupied until 12 m. on the 4th of July, when the command again moved forward to a position on the right of the Fourth Division, Sixteenth Army Corps, the Second Brigade in line, the First Brigade in reserve, and the Sixty-sixth and Ninth Illinois Volunteers as skirmishers. Sharp skirmishing commenced and continued until 5 p. m., when orders were received for the command to move forward and take the enemy's works. The advance was immediately made by the Sixth-sixth and Ninth Illinois Volunteers as skirmishers. Sharp skirmishing commenced and continued until 5 p. m., when orders were received for the command to move forward and take the enemy's works. The advance was immediately made by the Sixty-sixth Illinois Volunteers, well supported, and at dusk the enemy was driven from his works (although making a stubborn resistance), which were occupied by the entire division during the night. At an early hour on the morning of the 5th of July a skirmish line was advanced a distance of two or three miles, without meeting with any serious opposition from the enemy. At 1 p. m. of this day the command moved back on to the Sandtown road, and thence to the Widow Mitchell's, where the division was massed in an open field, remaining until the 7th of July. On this day the Sixty-sixth Illinois Volunteers, with one section of Battery C, First Michigan Artillery, was moved down the Sandtown road to the river, engaging the enemy on its opposite side, who opened with artillery and musketry. On the 8th of July, in compliance with orders, the remainder of the Second Brigade was sent down to Sandtown with instructions to make a demonstration upon the enemy. It arrived at the point designated at 7 a. m., taking position, and throwing skirmishers down the river to the right, and making such other dispositions as would lead the enemy to believe that the real crossing was to be made at this place. The casualties in this command while before Kenesaw Mountain, and up to July 9, were as follows: Commissioned officers-wounded, 3; enlisted men-killed, 1; wounded, 39; aggregate, 43. Early on the morning of July 9 the entire command was put in motion, in rear of the Fourth Division, Sixteenth Army Corps, for Marietta, at which place it arrived at 8 p. m., and bivouacked on the east side of the town. At 4 a. m. July 10 the division moved out, followed by the Fourth Division,