War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0365 Chapter L. REPORTS, ET.-ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE.

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altogether, the enemy either not being able to withstand the number of guns serve against them, or satisfied that they were doing us little or no injury, and desiring to save their ammunition. The number of casualties were as follows: 2 privates wounded.

J. H. BURTON,

Captain and Chief of Artillery.

Captain GEORGE J. WILKINSON,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Fourth Div., 15th Army Corps.

HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION, 15TH ARMY CORPS,

Before Atlanta, August 23, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to report that the artillery of this division has been kept pretty busy a portion of the day, having fired seventy-five rounds. The ammunition has been principally expended in the destruction of the enemy's skirmish pits. A few shots, however, were exchanged with the forts in our front. The casualties were as follows: 1 man killed.

J. H. BURTON,

Captain and Chief of Artillery.

Captain GEORGE J. WILKINSON,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Fourth Div., 15th Army Corps.

Numbers 523.

Reports of Lieutenant William H. Gay, First Iowa Battery, of operations May 1-15 and July 20-22.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST IOWA BATTERY,

In the Field, Ga., June 4, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to report on the 1st of May one section of this battery, commanded by Lieutenant A. S. Curtiss, left Scottsborough, Ala., with the Fourth Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, marching in the direction of Chattanooga. The two sections remaining being without horses, I was ordered by the general to remain until horses were sent me, and then at once rejoin the command. After remaining three days, and finding that there was no probability of receiving horses at this point, I telegraphed to Major Stolbrand, chief of artillery for the corps, my situation, who immediately ordered me to proceed with the battery on first train for Chattanooga, and report. I immediately complied with this order, placing Lieutenant D. M. Parks in charge, while I, which sixteen mounted men and one transportation wagon, marched for Chattanooga, where I arrived on the 6th at noon; found the guns had arrived the day before. Reporting at corps headquarters I found that horses were expected on the first train from Nashville. On the 7th the horses came, and I made immediate preparation to rejoin the division. Many of the horses were without shoes, and I was compelled to delay long enough to get them shod. Left Chattanooga on the 9th, and reached the command at Snake [Creek] Gap on the evening of the 11th.

On the 13th we moved upon the enemy, and found him in force at Resaca. About 4 p. m. I was ordered by you to take position on