War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0273 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE.

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Numbers 490.

Report of Colonel Clark R. Weaver, Seventeenth Iowa Infantry, of capture of train (July 5) near Tilton, Ga.

HDQRS. SEVENTEENTH IOWA VET. VOL. INFANTRY,

Tilton, Ga., July 12, 1864.

LIEUTENANT: In compliance with orders from your headquarters, of date Resaca, Ga., July 11, 1864, I herewith submit the following statement in relation to the capture of the train on the evening of July 5, together with a copy of Lieutenant Colonel Archer's report of same (inclosed):

Soon after sunset on the evening above mentioned, a list was discovered in the direction of Dalton. My attention was called to if. I was unable to determine whether it was a fire, or, as my officers supposed, "northern lights." Just at this time the patrol, which had been sent out at the usual hour, returned and reported that the rebels had captured and were burning a train. I immediately dispatched four companies, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Archer, to whose report I call your attention for further information.

In reply to your questions I would state: First, that the train was captured about six miles north of Tilton, just before sunset. Second, I can form a idea of the loss sustained; was informed by the engineer that there were 16 cars, loaded with coffee and flour. The train was completely destroyed. Third, I have no means of estimating the amount of firing done. The engineer and his comrade (who was wounded) reported that as soon as the locomotive ran off the track the train was surrounded by from 200 to 300 men, who fired a volley or two into the train. My opinion is they were too badly scared to be able to fell whether there were 25 or 300 men in the band. The rebs. wore spurs. Fourth, it was fully two hours after the train was captured before my troops reached that point. The enemy, very likely, had possession all that time. Fifth, no firing was heard at Tilton. A detachment of Seventh Illinois Veteran Volunteers were stationed at a water-tank about one mile above where the train was captured. They were taken down by the train was captured. They were taken down by the train following. Sixth, I received information of the disaster shortly after, sunset, and immediately sent four companies, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Archer, to the spot.

Very respectfully,

C. R. WEAVER,

Colonel Seventeenth Iowa Vet. Vol. Infty., Commanding Post.

Lieutenant M. NICHELSON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, Second Brigade.

Numbers 491.

Reports of Lieutenant Colonel Samson M. Archer, Seventeenth Iowa Infantry, of capture of train (July 5) and affair (August 15) near Tilton, Ga.

TILTON, GA., July 11, 1864.

COLONEL: I herewith submit the following report in relation to the disaster on the railroad on the evening of July 5, 1864:

In accordance with your orders, at 7.30 p. m. of July 5, I took Companies C, H, I, and K and marched up the railroad, reaching

18 R R-VOL XXXVIII, PT III