War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0270 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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HDQRS. SECOND Brigadier, THIRD DIV., FIFTEENTH CORPS,

Resaca, Ga., September 2, 1864.

CAPTAIN: In compliance with the order referring a communication from the headquarters of the District of the Etowah to the

general commanding the division, of date August 25, 1864, and herewith returned, I have the honor of submitting the following report:

On the evening of the 14th ultimo, having received reliable information of the strength and movements of Wheeler's cavalry I directed Lieutenant-Colonel Archer, commanding Seventeenth Iowa Volunteers, to concentrate the detachment two miles south of Dalton, report to Colonel Laiboldt at that place. Captain Snodgrass was posted fourteen miles north of these headquarters. There being no telegraph office at Tilton, he was communicated with by courier, not, however, before the enemy had attacked Dalton. Being directed to go to that place, and it being impracticable for him to do so, he concluded to remain at, and defend himself in, a stockade erected for the protection of a water-tank. During the night the stockade was surrounded by the enemy and some shots were exchanged. The next morning, from the best information I can obtain, a pretty steady fire was kept up from the stockade until about 8 o'clock, the men firing about twenty rounds each. The enemy by this time brought into position two pieces of artillery, and under a flag of truce demanded a surrender of the stockade until about 8 o'clock, the men firing about twenty rounds each. The enemy by this time brought into position two pieces of artillery, and under a flag of truce demanded a surrender of the stockade and the captain and his men as prisoners of war, which command was complied with. The stockade was of sufficient strength to resist musketry, but would afford no protection against artillery. The captain surrendered his command without suffering any loss, upon the well-grounded belief that, with the use of artillery, the enemy would be ale to annihilate his force. He could not hope for assistance, Dalton being invested and Tilton being seven miles distant, that being the nearest point from which troops could be sent. I would add that Captain Snodgrass has been in several engagements and has ever acted with coolness and courage. I herewith inclose a copy of a report, I caused him to make.*

I have been unable to learn what loss the enemy suffered in the affair, but it is believed they lost 3 killed and several wounded. They, however, denied any loss.

I inclose a copy of a report made by Lieutenant-Colonel Archer touching the part taken by him in resisting the attack made by the enemy on the railroad south of Tilton.

At 10 a. m. of the 15th ultimo I received notice that the enemy had attacked the railroad south of Tilton. I immediately sent the Eightieth Ohio, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Metham, and eighty cavalry, under Captain Robinson, to attack the enemy. these troops although moving with great rapidity, did not reach the point until after the enemy had withdrawn.

Hoping the foregoing will be sufficiently explicit, I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GREEN B. RAUM,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

Captain S. M. BUDLONG,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Third Div., 15th Army Corps.

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*See p. 276.

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