War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0044 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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of that leading to Jonesborough, while General Logan, followed by the trains, pursued the main road. General Kilpatrick was dircted to scout the front and cover the right, as on the previous march. There was a little skirmishing, but no very decided oppositin, till we reached the point where Ransom's road came into Logan's. At this intersectio what appeared to be a brigade of rebel cavalry had made quite an extensive cover of rail barricades. General Kipatrick's cavalry, supported by two regiments of infnatry (Ransom's), drove them from one line, but they had another pripared close by. This time General Hazen, of Logan's corps, turned their position, when the rebel cavalry retreated to take up another. The rebels made a strong stand at Shoal Creek, briskly firing upon our advance with aertillery. Teir position was again turned and they were driven back. CVonstant skirmishing ocurred till we reached Renfroe Place. This time General Hazen, of Logan's corps, turned their position, when the rebel cavarly retreated to take up another.

The rebels made a strong stand at Shoal Creek, briskly firing upon our advance with artillery. Teir position was again turned and they were driven back. Constant skirmishing occurred till we reached Renfroe Place. This was the right of the general position selected by General Sherman, but in converstion he had authorized me, that if I thought I could reach the railroad at Jonsborough, to push ahead.

All information went to show that the rebels had some force intrenched at Jonsborough. Accounts varied from two brigades to a corps. I found that scarcely a drop of water could be obtained without retiring a mile, and that there was none agiad short of Flint River. I thought if I could secure a lodgment on the eastern bank of the Flint I might be able to break the railroad next morning or enable other portins of the army to do so, and at the same time secure the waters o the Flint for our use. After a short rest, the columns marched on, General Logan's preceded by a squadronof cavalry, under Captain Estes, of Kipatrick's staff, and the other column preceded by Kipatrick's main body, cutting teir own road for the most part of the way. Captain Estes pushed so fast that the rebel cavalry could make no other stand from Renfroe to the Flint. On reaching Flint it was discovered that the bridge was not destroyed, the enemy defending it from barricades on the opposite back. I directed it to be caried. Captain Estes deployed hes cavalry, now increased to part of two regiments, armed with Spencer rifles. He was followed closely by Hazen's skirmishers. The cavalry rushed for the river- bank, and fired so fast that the rebels could with difficulty reply. Under cover of this fire a charge was made across the bridge, and the first and second lines of barricades seized. The enemy made still another stand a few rods to their rear, alnd opened a sharp fire on our advance, wkhen, as if by a spontaneous impulse, General Logan's skirmishers, now over the river, made a dash upon the enemy. Again he fired. With considerable skirmishing the advance of the Fifteenth Corps reached the highest ground between Flint River and the railroad. Here I directed General Logan to place in position his corps, reserving one division. This he did- Hazen on the left of the road, Harrow on the right, Oster- haus in reserve. General Kilpatrick pushed over a small part of his command and marched directly toward the town on a branch road, to the right of the one above mentioned. He encountered the enemy's infantry in a large corn-field just at dark, upon which he made an assault withot any material success. GeneralLogan took advantage of the position he had gained, sending a small force to hold it. Though our arrival in camp was not effected till dark, and the men had marched fighting for fifteen miles, and were, therefore,