War of the Rebellion: Serial 074 Page 0025 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.- ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE.

Search Civil War Official Records

fore gave General Blair, commanding the Seventeenth Corps, the most positive and emphatic orders to hold the hill at whatever cost. It was apparent, also, that our most iminent danger was from the great interval between the Seventeenth and Sixteenth Corps. In order to close it, and at the same time adjust our lines in such manner that the Bald Hill might be held, I ordered General Blair, as soon as it could be done with safety, to bring his Fourth Division back to such a line that its right should connect with Leggett's left, and the left of the divisin with COlonel Wangelin's Brigade. I also ordered General Dodge to swing his right, or refused line, up, so as t connect with the left of Wangelin's brigade. Before these movements could be executed the enemy had reformed, under cover of the woods and in the rear of the works which the Seventeenth Corps had constructed the day before, and made a second assault upon the Seventeenth Corps, which, after a severe struggle, was repulsed. Repeated attempts were made to drive the Seventeenth Corps from the position it held in the rear of the works which the Seventeenth Corps had constructed the day before, and made a second assault upon t eSeventeenth Corps, which, after a sever strugggle, was repulsed. Repeated attempts were made to drive the Seventeenth Corps from the position it held in the rear of the works, but each was repulsed. Another attack was made upon the Third Divisin by a fresh column, moving rom the suotheast in such directin as to threaten General Smith's right and rear as he then faced. Smith formed two lines perpendicular to hhis works to receive the assault. The enemy struck Colnel Hll's line on the front a nd right, in a slid column three lines deep, and forced him back into the works. Colonel Potts' brigade, however, held its grond, and the enemy finally fell back in considerable disorder. It was now about 3 in the afternoon, as I recollect. For two hours the diferent assaults upon the position of the Seventeenth Corps, pricipally made upon General Giles A. Smith's division, had been unsuccessful in so far as carrying it. The enemy, however, was in possession of the flank, and, perhaps, 200 yards of the main line, and it had been impossible to move the Fourth Division as I had ordered. Up to this time the Fifteenth Corps had not been attacked; the whole eforts of the enemy had been directed against the left of the Army of the Tennessee. At 3.30 the enemy made an attack upon the Second Division of the Fifteenth Corps. It was ascertained by the provost- marchals from prisoners captured,and COnfederate reports subsequently made, that the attack upon the front of the Fifteenth Corps, and, shortly afterward, upon the front of the Seventeenth Corps, was made by the corps heretofore commanded by General Hood, and at that time under command of General Cheatham. The enemy advanced from the direction of their main works about Atlanta in columns of regiments. The attacking columns moved rapidly upon the Second Division, commanded by General Lightburn. The first assault was repulsed. Their lines, however, were rapidly reformed, and the assault renewed repeatedly, but without sussess. The withdrawal of Colonel Martin's brigade form the Second Division, to re- enforce the Sixteenth Corps, made an interval between the right of the Second and left of the FIrst Division, which was held by a thin line of skirmishers. Whangelin's brigade had been withdrawn from the First Divisioh, so that there were no reserves to the forps. At this point was a deep cut of the railroad, on the right of which four guns of Battery A, First illinois Artillery, were in position, and firing by the right oblique at the broken line of the enemy. Under the smoke of Battery A a rebel coumn marched rapedly by the flank up the main dirt road and through the deep cut of the railroad and were in rear of our lines before the officers or men were aware of their intention. The division at once fell back, the greater