War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0922 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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on Utoy Creek and in camp near my quarters, and took the other portion and made a scout through to the vicinity of the right of General Hascall's position, but found no rebels in the rear of it. I do not think it practicable to picket the line of road traveled to-day, and think that the line of Utoy Creek is the best one for the protection of the flank from the right of our line to the river. There are no natural advantages on the line of the Sandtown road.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ISRAEL GARRARD,

Colonel, Commanding.

Major J. A. CAMPBELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. CAVALRY COMMAND, DEPT. OF THE OHIO,

Before Atlanta, Ga., August 12, 1864.

MAJOR: I have the honor to report that the scouts ordered this morning to scout from the bridge over Utoy to Sandtown, and from Donahue's Mill to the cross-roads near the Owl Rock Church, met heavy pickets of the enemy, indicating that the country over which I scouted yesterday had been reoccupied. The enemy's pickets made a stubborn resistance, but were driven in, and scouts made as far as Sandtown and to the cross-roads near the Owl Rock Church.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ISRAEL GARRARD,

Colonel, Commanding.

Major J. A. CAMPBELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. CAVALRY DIVISION, ARMY OF THE OHIO,

August 16, 1864-11 p. m.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your note asking report of to-day's operations, accompanying letter to Brigadier-General Kilpatrick, which will be forwarded as soon as the couriers can get mounted.

This morning, about 8 o'clock, we moved from the camp of last night, which was about four miles from Fairburn, coming back to Dry Pond. At this point my division moved in advance on the Atlanta road until I passed the cross-roads. The right-hand road leads to the vicinity of Mount Gilead Church, and the place where it was stated the rebel cavalry had been in camp. This camp was one mile and a half from the cross-roads. After passing the cross-roads I formed line of battle facing toward Atlanta, and remained in that position until I moved to my present position on this road. There was an occasional exchange of shots between my vedettes and rebel cavalry vedettes, or scouts, during the day. I have no further information of to-day's operations, except from the report of a staff officer of General Kilpatrick's staff, that the force sent down the right-hand road to the cavalry camp found only 50 or 100 there, and that the cavalry and artillery force developed last evening (by the reconnaissance and demonstration of the Ninth Michigan Cavalry) had gone. My impression is, from the courses and distances traveled yesterday and to-day, that the expedition of to-day did not reach the point at which the enemy was found last