War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0884 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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occupying until near 12 o'clock before we could rest. Next morning, the 4th instant, early, orders were received to relieve the Ninety-second Illinois, on duty at Flint River bridge. I reported to General Kilpatrick, and received orders to send twenty-five men on Griffin road, to go as far as possible, and twenty-five men to go to Lovejoy's Station. Captain Stanley was sent with the first-named party, and Captain Crowell with the latter. Both proceeded on the different roads, but neither were able to go farther than two miles. Captain Crowell found Armstrong's brigade of rebel cavalry in his front, and Captain Stanley met a force, but could not ascertain to what command they belonged. He succeeded in capturing 1 prisoner, and then returned to the river. Captain Crowell was kept busy all the time we remained at this point in patrolling, and on several occasions driving in the enemy's pickets, until 4 o'clock, when he succeeded in going clear through and opening communications with our infantry. Then by order of General Kilpatrick, the Eighth Indiana was moved forward on the Jonesborough road until we joined the rest of our infantry line. Here we remained in line until the balance of our brigade came up, then went into camp, and built a barricade covering our front and flanks. Here we remained until the army fell back on the night of the 6th instant, without anything occurring, except getting 1 man wounded. We then fell back with out brigade, arriving at this place yesterday, the 8th instant, where we found our baggage and camp equipage for the first time since leaving Nashville, just two months.

I cannot close this report without referring to the conduct of the gallant offices and men of my command. Many of the men were non-veterans, whose term of service had expired on the 29th instant. Still not a murmur was heard from one of them, all being ready and willing at all times to obey the commands of their superior officers, and to do their duty.

I cannot close this report without referring to the conduct of the gallant offices and men of my command. Many of the men were non-veterans, whose term of service had expired on the 29th instant. Still not a murmur was heard from one of them, all being ready and willing at all times to obey the commands of their superior officers, and to do their duty.

To Captains Foote, Crowell, and Stanley, Lieutenants Blake, Ockerman, Howard, McManaman, and Drowning, I am much indebted for their gallant conduct on every occasion.

Lieutenant Norwel, acting quartermaster, rendered much valuable aid, and distinguished himself by his gallant conduct wherever occasion offered, and would respectfully recommend him, as well as all the above mentioned, as worthy of holding even higher positions than they now occupy.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. GRAHAM,

Major, Commanding Eighth Indiana Cavalry.

Captain EDWARD REEVES,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Second Brigadier, Third Cav. Div.

Numbers 420.

Report of Lieutenant Carneal Nall, Second Kentucky Cavalry, of operations August 26-September 8.

HDQRS. DETACHMENT SECOND KENTUCKY CAVALRY,

Mount Zion Church, Ga., September 9, 1864.

COLONEL: I have the honor to make the following report of the action taken by a detachment of the Second Kentucky Cavalry, beginning August 26, to date:

In obedience to orders received from headquarters Second Brigade, Third Cavalry Division, all mounted men of this regiment, forty in