War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0857 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.- ARMY OF THE CUMB'D (CAVALRY).

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structed by my people, attacked the Ninety-second Illinois in opposition a few hundred yards from the river on the crest of a hill, was repulsed, and retired across the river. In the mean time Captain Qualman, Third Indiana Cavalry, with a strong force of picked men, dashed in on the railroad four miles below, effectually destroyed upward of 50 yards of track, burning the ties and bending the rails, and brought with his into camp about half a mile of telegraph wire. He lost 1 man killed. My people are now guarding all the roads leading from fords or brigades as far down was the roads leading from fords or bridges as far down as the point where the Jonesborough and Fayetteville road crossed the river. I will make every effort to learn the position, strength, and movements of the enemy and keep you advised.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. KILPATRICK,

Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

Lieutenant DAVID F. HOW,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD CAVALRY DIVISION,

Near Jonesborough, September 1, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to forward the following list of casualties of my command for August 31 and September 1: First Brigade - Killed, 1 commissioned officer; wounded, 7 enlisted men; missing, 8 enlisted men; 2 of this number wounded. Second Brigade - Killed, 1 enlisted man; wounded, 3 commissioned officers and 11 enlisted men; missing, 7 enlisted men. Third Brigade - Wounded, 3 enlisted men.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. KILPATRICK,

Brigadier-General.

Lieutenant DAVID F. HOW,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD CAVALRY DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Camp Crooks, Ga., September 13, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my command during the recent campaign, commencing with the advance across Taylor's Ridge and battle of Resaca, and ending with the defeat of the rebel army and fall of Atlanta:

The command left its encampment at Ringgold, Ga., at 3 a. m., May 7, 1864, crossed Taylor's Ridge, through Nickajack Trace, forced back the rebel cavalry, covering and masking the movements of the Twentieth Corps, Major-General Hooker commanding, of the Army of the Cumberland, and encamped near Trickum Post-Office May 7, 1864. May 8, 1864, moved to Villanow, and opened communication commanding. Received orders and reported, with my command, to Major-General McPherson, on south side of Stony Face Ridge, at the entrance of Snake Creek Gap. Made reconnaissances, and scouted the country during the 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th of May; led the advance of the Army of the Tennessee in the attack on Resaca, drove the enemy's cavalry and infantry skirmish line back behind his works, masking the movements of our infantry until the force of the enemy was too great to contend with longer, when I was re-