War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0856 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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sections of track were torn up in many places, Colonel Klein also captured a train of 20 wagons, brought home the animals, and destroyed the wagons. he brought in 17 prisoners; they will be forwarded to you this evening.

I omitted to mention in my report of this morning that one gun belonging to the Chicago Board of Trade Battery exploded in the engagement near McDonough; that a gun-carriage of another gun became disabled and the gun thrown into Cotton Indian Creek.

I will forwarded the report of division and brigade commanders as soon as received.

J. KILPATRICK,

Brigadier-General.

Brigadier-General ELLIOTT,

Chief of Cavalry, Dept. of the Cumberland.

HDQRS. THIRD CAV. DIV., DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

On Flint River, August 31, 1864.

GENERAL: I left my camp yesterday morning at 6.30 a. m., in advance of General Ransom's column. Met the enemy two miles out, and drove him back to the cross-roads, five miles from the railroad. Here he made a determined resistance with the assistance of 400 infantry. He was again driven back from one position to another till a favorable opportunity offered, when I rushed the Ninety-second Illinois forward, saved the bridge, and crossed in face of rifle-pits. Captain Estes and the officers and men of the Ninety-second Illinois are alone entitled to all the praise for this successful exploit. Three regiments of my division were at once crossed and pushed in to the right of the infantry, and made a deliberate effort to reach the road below Jonesborough. The enemy in front of my cavalry was driven to within 300 yards of the track, but we could not reach it, owing to my small force and the fact that it was quite dark. My people fell back to a strong position, and at daylight this a. m. recrossed the river.

I will send you during the day a nominal list of casualties.

As soon as Major-General Howard finds his left flank is safe, by his directions I will cross the river below Jonesborough, and reach the railroad, if possible. One hour of daylight would have given me the road last evening.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. KILPATRICK,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Brigadier-General ELLIOTT,

Chief of Cavalry, Dept. of the Cumberland.

HDQRS. THIRD CAV. DIV., DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Near Flint River, August 31, 1864.

I have the honor to report that I forced a passage on the river half a mile below Jonesborough, drove in the enemy's pickets directly in his rear to a point within half a mile of the town, dismounted an entire brigade, sent the horses back across the river, and held position; repulsed two determined attacks of rebel infantry, and only retired when nearly enveloped, as I have since been informed, by the rebel General Cleburne's entire division. The enemy forced me from the banks of the river; crossed on a bridge con-