War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0833 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMB'D (CAVALRY).

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From August 1 to August 15 the command was five miles away from the horses. Four horses were groomed by one man; consequently they were not as well taken care off as the rider would give them, and for forty-eight hours the stock was without feed. August 15 and 16, received one quart per head, and marched twenty-four miles over a country devastated by the army. August 17 and 18, received one pint of feed from Third Division. August 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24, traveled 120 miles, feeding but once, upon green corn. Half ration of forage was issued to September 9. September 9, 10, and 11, no feed and no grazing. The stock received no salt or hay during the campaign.

Lost in action August 20, 112 horses.

Horses.

Started with.............................................. 919

Captured.................................................. 42

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Total..................................................... 961

Abandoned and died........................................ 230

Killed and captured....................................... 171

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Total loss................................................. 401

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Present in the field....................................... 560

The regiment traveled 902 miles, not including picket duty and company scouting.

The horses were without feed twenty-six days and scant feed twenty-seven days. For seven consecutive days the horses were without feed of any kind. The majority of the horses died and abandoned were literally starved. The seven days at Pumpkin Vine Church reduced the horses beyond recuperation.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. H. JENNINGS,

Major, Commanding Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry.

Captain R. BURNS,

A. A. A. G., First Brigade, Second Cavalry Division.

HDQRS. SEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA VET. VOL. CAVALRY,

Pace's Ferry, Ga., August 27, 1864.

I have the honor to report that my regiment left camp on Peach Tree road, at 12 p. m. on the 17th instant, as rear guard of the brigade. Arrived at Sandtown at 8 a. m. on the 18th instant. Left Sandtown at sundown, as rear guard to the expedition, until, daybreak on the 19th, the order of march was changed. At 8 a. m. my command was fired into from and ambush. My Third Battalion, commanded by Major Andress, was cut off. With two battalions (First and Second) I proceeded down the road about 300 yards, dismounted, and formed a line, and deployed Company E as skirmishers. My Third Battalion rejoined regiment in about one hour, by making a circuit through the woods; barricaded the road, and remained until the entire command had passed. Received an order from Colonel Minty to rejoin the brigade at a cross-roads (name unknown). The brigade moved with the Second Battalion of my

53 R R-VOL XXXVIII, PT II