War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0803 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMB'D (CAVALRY).

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second and third charge upon the exposed section, but were repeatedly checked and driven back into the woods. The fight had lasted nearly two hours, during which time I expended all the canister and nearly all the shells. I reported these facts to Brigadier General E. M. McCook, who ordered me to abandon the artillery. The guns were spiked and otherwise injured; the carriages and harness were utterly destroyed. No casualty occurred.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MARTIN J. MILLER,

Lieutenant, Eighteenth Indiana Battery.

Lieutenant STURGES.

Numbers 398.

Reports of Brigadier General Kenner Garrard, U. S. Army, commanding Second Division.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CAVALRY DIVISION,

Camp near Jonesborough, Ga., September 4, 1864.

GENERAL: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by this division in the campaign just terminated by the fall of Atlanta:

About the middle of April my division was very much scattered over the department, and, with the view of reorganization, was ordered to Columbia, Tenn. Before, however, Long's brigade was mounted, I was ordered to join the army before Dalton. on the 30th April, with Wilder's and Minty's brigades and the Chicago Board of Trade Battery (six guns, First Lieutenant Robinson commanding), I left Columbia, and, at Bridgeport taking the route over Sand and Lookout Mountains, through La Fayette, joined the army at Villanow on the 10th of May.

On the 15th of May I was ordered to make a reconnaissance toward Rome, and, if possible, cross the Oostenaula River. At Farmer's Bridge the pickets of the enemy were encountered, and Minty's brigade was ordered to drive them in, which he did, and pursued the enemy to within sight of Rome, where he developed a force too large to engage. In the mean time, an examination of the Oostenaula River proved that a crossing was impracticable, as there were neither fords nor bridges between Rome and Resaca. On the 16th the division crossed the river at Lay's Ferry, and took position on the right of the army. On the 18th, under the orders of General Sherman, the railroad between Rome and Resaca. On the 16th the division crossed the river at Lay's Ferry, and took position on the right of the army. On the 18th, under the orders of General Sherman, the railroad between Rome and Kingston was broken, and the telegraph wire between Kingston and Adairsville was cut. Both of these duties was assigned and performed by Wilder's brigade. When near Kingston, and before the position of our army was known, Minty's brigade furnished a force to discover what was in Kingston. The Fourth Michigan Cavalry dashed into that town, and discovered that it was held only by the enemy's cavalry. On the 19th the division secured and held the road bridge on which the Army of the Cumberland crossed the Etowah River. From this point the division moved, with the Army of the Tennessee, toward Dallas, and six miles in advance of that army it moved directly on Dallas, engaging Bate's brigade [division?] of infantry and some cavalry, ascertaining that Hardee's corps was marching for Dallas, and held the line of Pumpkin Vine Creek till the arrival of the Fifteenth Army