War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0795 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMB'D (CAVALRY).

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captured by scouting parties. As the horses now in use have hard duty to perform, and can get but a scanty supply of forage, it is not reasonable to suppose that they will ever improve any; and it does not seem improbable that within a few weeks the entire command will be dismounted, unless fresh horses can be obtained.

I have the honor to be, captain, with much respect, your very obedient servant,

LOUIS D. WATKINS,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

Captain ROBERT LE ROY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS U. S. FORCES,

La Fayette, Ga., June 26, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that in compliance orders received from Major General James B. Steedman, commanding District of the Etowah, I took possession of this place on the 19th instant, with detachments from the Fourth, Sixth, and Seventh Kentucky Cavalry, commanded, respectively, by Captain John M. Bacon, Major W. H. Fidler, and Colonel John K. Faulkner, in all, 400 men. My object in coming here was principally to recruit up the horses of my command; and I was charged to scout the country thoroughly and keep General Steedman advised of any movements the enemy might make in this neighborhood. I had been in quiet possession of the place for five days, and was just on the point of starting on a scout to Romeo, when I was attacked on the morning of the 24th by a division of rebel cavalry commanded by Brigadier-General Pillow. The attack was made at 3 o'clock in the morning, the enemy advancing on every road approaching the town. I mounted the men of my command who had horses, and charged them, and finding their force greatly superior to mine I fell back, dismounted my men, and placed them in the court-house, jail, and several brick dwellings in the vicinity, and opened a hot fire upon them. The fight was very spirited, the rebels making several desperate charges, all of which were repulsed with loss to them. After the fight had been in progress for about two hours the Confederate commander sent in under flag of truce a demand for the surrender of the place, couched in the following language:

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION,

La Fayette, Ga., June 24, 1864.

TO THE COMMAND OFFICER U. S. FORCES, LA FAYETTE, GA.:

SIR: To prevent an unnecessary shedding of blood I demand of you an immediate surrender of this post and your forces. I have the force to take place and am determined to do it. If necessary I will resort to the torch as well as to shot and shell to drive you from your present position. An immediate answer is required.

Respectfully,

GID. J. PILLOW,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

In answer to General Pillow's note I replied, respectfully declining to comply with his demands. The fight was then resumed with great fury, and raged for three hours or more, the enemy gaining no advantage whatever, when, about 8.30 o'clock, Colonel Croxton's regiment, the Fourth Kentucky Mounted Infantry, appearing in