War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0761 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMB'D (CAVALRY).

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feats to-day. I had ordered a detachment to cross at Cochran's Ford. It was deep, and he took them over naked, nothing but guns, cartridge-boxes and hats. They drove the enemy out of their rifle-pits, captured a non-commissioned officer and 3 men, and the 2 boats on the other side. They would have got more, but the rebels had the advantage in running through the bushes with clothes on. It was certainly one of the funniest sights of the war, and a very successful raid for naked men to make. Everything is quiet along the line, and citizens on the other side say the enemy were totally unprepared for a crossing on this flank.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. M. McCOOK,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.

[Brigadier General W. L. ELLIOTT,

Chief of Cavalry.]

HEADQUARTERS FIRST CAVALRY DIVISION,

July 22, 1864.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I found the enemy in sufficient force at the junction of this road and the Mason and Turner's Ferry road to check me. They had both infantry and artillery and I was unable to get my artillery in position to reply. It was too late for me to make a good fight. I will try in the morning. I am, I think, about four or five miles to the right of the infantry, and will get communication some time during the night.

E. M. McCOOK,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

General W. L. ELLIOTT,

Chief of Cavalry.

HDQRS. FIRST CAV. DIV., DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

July 23, 1864-8.30 a. m.

My command drove the rebels away from here this morning. The force in my front was Jackson's division. I got the report of effective force of one brigade (Harrison's), and it numbers 1,618 men. So I judge the division is strong, which is confirmed by prisoners taken. I will open communication with General Davis as soon as possible. It is about a mile from here to the river. I sent the dispatch to General Stoneman across.

Very respectfully,

E. M. McCOOK,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Lieutenant D. F. HOW.

THIRTEEN MILES SOUTHWEST OF DALLAS,

August 3, 1864.

On the morning of the 29th [July] I cut the West Point railroad at Palmetto, and thoroughly destroyed Macon railroad for two and a half miles at Lovejoy's; removed telegraph wire for five miles, and burned two trains. I also burned about 100 bales of cotton, and over 500 wagons, including headquarters trains of nearly their whole army, Hardee's entire transportation and the cavalry command supply train; killed about 800 mules and captured 72 commissioned offi-