War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0759 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMB'D (CAVALRY)

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of this point, has returned. They report that they found the country very thoroughly occupied by the enemy's scouts, so that they were compelled to take by-roads and the woods for a great portion of the distance. There was no force either at Villa Rica or Pumpkin Vine Post-Office, but four brigades of the enemy's cavalry had been at Villa Rica day before yesterday, and marched from there in the direction of Sandtown. They report the country filled with scouting parties, and found a number of rebel soldiers hiding to escape these scouts. A party of sixty of the enemy passed through Villa Rica to Cedartown yesterday.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. M. McCOOK,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General W. L. ELLIOTT,

Chief of Cavalry, Dept. of the Cumberland.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST CAVALRY DIVISION,

Near Sweet Water Creek, July 3, 1864.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that my command has been operating under the orders of General Stoneman since we left Lost Mountain. Our part, however, has been a secondary one. Found no enemy, except a few of Lee's battalion State militia. Colonel Adams captured 4 or 5 of them, and one of my detachment, in a scout toward Pumpkin Vine, captured a sergeant and 2 men of Armstrong's scouts. No person in either of the commands has been killed or wounded yet. My impression is that the first day out we could have crossed the river at Campbellton or any place else near there. Citizens report that nothing was there at that time, and that now the Georgia militia infantry are there. I cannot account for their cavalry not making their appearance, unless we are too far to their left, or they don't want to fight, or are busy in some other direction. I wish you would be kind enough to send the inclosed dispatch to Captain Rankin or Captain Garfield. Our rations expire to-day. I suppose General Stoneman will let me off as soon as he connects once more with our infantry right, as I don't imagine any present or probable necessity will exist for keeping me longer than to-day. When I leave I will make my first camp near Powder Springs. I think unless we fight to-day there is no prospect of a fight at present. There is more forage in vicinity of Powder Springs than near Lost Mountain. Be kind enough to send me the news by return messenger.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. M. McCOOK,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

[Brigadier General W. L. ELLIOTT,

Chief of Cavalry.]

HDQRS. FIRST CAV. DIV., DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

July 4, 1864-3.30 p. m.

GENERAL: Yesterday, after writing to you, and after General Stoneman had moved to the right of our army, I took 300 men and a section of artillery and advanced on the Howell and Green's Ferry road to a point where it crossed the main Sandtown road. There I