War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0750 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

Search Civil War Official Records

Approximate report of casualties of the cavalry, &c.-Continued.

First Second Third Fourth Total.

Divisi Divisi Divisi Divisi

on. on. on. on.

Enlisted men-

Killed 33 66 16 --- 115

Wounded-

Slightly 85 186 67 --- 338

Severely 40 60 38 --- 138

Mortally --- 1 5 --- 6

Missing 912 144 45 --- 1,101

Total 1,070 457 171 --- 1,698

Rebel prisoners of war

Commissioned officers 18 29 14 --- 61

Enlisted men 247 a427 264 --- 938

a In addition to this number about 200 were turned over to the Army of the Tennessee, it being impracticable to send them to headquarters Department of the Cumberland.

W. L. ELLIOTT,

Brigadier General U. S. V., Chief of Cav., Dept. of the Cumberland.

HDQRS. CHIEF OF CAV., DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Atlanta, Ga., September 13, 1864.

Numbers 380.

Reports of Brigadier General Edward M. McCook, U. S. Army, commanding First Division.

HDQRS. FIRST CAV. DIV., DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,

In the Field, May 9, 1864-2 p.m.

Major-General SCHOFIELD:

When I arrived at this gap, east of the railroad, I found a part of my Second Brigade falling back over this road toward your left. The rest of the brigade had fallen back on the main road between Dalton and Varnell's Station. I have sent the whole of this brigade along the line of this railroad to Varnell's, with orders to hold that point if possible. This gap-which I regard as important-being immediately on your left flank, I will endeavor to hold with the other brigade. The column which attacked my cavalry on the main Dalton and Varnell's Station road was composed of two brigades of infantry and one of cavalry with a battery of artillery. The enemy were checked at the junction of two roads near this point. My loss has been very serious, both in officers and men. The men, from the nature of the country, were compelled to fight dismounted and without artillery against their infantry, artillery, and cavalry. Some of the horses belonging to dismounted men were lost. The brigade came back in good order. Our cavalry drove theirs ten miles, until they came upon the infantry and artillery. At present they are making no further serious demonstrations toward our left. My line before was five miles long; it was impossible to make it shorter and cover the roads you desired me to cover in your orders of this morning. No country could be worse than this to handle cavalry in. The orderly who brings this will bring back any communication you desire to make to me.

E. M. McCOOK,

Colonel, Commanding.