War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0546 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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until daylight May 10, when the enemy opened fire, which continued until 7 a. m., when, by our order, I moved my command under fire of the enemy's artillery by left flank, in rear of First Brigade, to camp near Harris' house, supporting First Brigade until 6 a. m. May 12, when command moved through Tunnel Hill in direction of Snake Creek Gap, leaving One hundred and twenty-third Regiment three miles from Tunnel Hill, near the right of General Howard's corps, to protect the corps train; camped near a large brick house eight miles from Snake Creek Gap. Moved at 3 a. m. May 13; arrived at the mouth of Snake Creek Gap, where, by your order, I remained with my command (including Twenty-third Indiana Battery, and was joined by the One hundred and twenty-third Regiment Indiana Volunteers) until 10.30 a. m. May 14, when I moved my command through the gap, taking position in front of the enemy's works near Resaca, in support of General Hascall's command. Remained under arms until 5.30 a. m. May 15, when I was ordered to relieve General Hascall. Remained under fire of enemy's batteries and musketry, supporting Twenty-fourth Indiana Battery, until 11.30 a. m., when my command was relieved by General Carlin and moved to the extreme left of General Hooker's corps, passing through a narrow gorge on to an open field in front of enemy's batteries, where I caused One hundred and twenty-third Regiment Indiana Volunteers to form line of battle. The enemy opened heavy fire from masked batteries and musketry, when, by your order, the One hundred and twenty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteers and One hundred and thirtieth Indiana Volunteers were closed in column by division and retired into the gorge, sustaining but little injury. The One hundred and twenty-third Regiment was then ordered to return to the gorge under cover of the woods. Soon after the return of One hundred and twenty-third Regiment the left of General Hooker's corps to began to fall back, when the One hundred and twenty-third Regiment was ordered to take their former position and the One hundred and twenty-ninth and One hundred and thirtieth Regiments to charge in line of battle across the open field, the One hundred and twenty-ninth Regiment, Colonel Case commanding, in advance. On reaching the woods the right of the One hundred and twenty-ninth joined the left of General Hooker's corps and immediately engaged the enemy. The One hundred and twenty-third Indiana Volunteers formed on the left of One hundred and twenty-ninth, the One hundred and thirtieth formed in rear of left of General Hooker's corps, while Companies A of One hundred and twenty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, Captain Cole commanding, and A of One hundred and twenty-third Regiment, the whole under command of Major Walters, of One hundred and twenty-third Regiment, were deployed as skirmishers on our extreme left and engaged the enemy with considerable effect. The firing continued about one hour, chiefly by the One hundred and twenty-ninth Regiment, when the enemy hoisted a white flag, and several prisoners were taken. The fire of the One hundred and twenty-ninth Regiment was well directed and repulsed the enemy with great slaughter. Twenty-seven of the enemy's dead were left an about one acre of ground in the immediate front of the One hundred and twenty-ninth Regiment. Skirmishing continued on our left, when I ordered four additional companies of the One hundred and twenty-third Regiment, viz, B, E, G, and K, to their support, when they drove the enemy from the Atlanta railroad, taking sev-