War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0494 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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death of the brave Lieutenant-Colonel Eifort, of the Second Kentucky, who received a mortal wound while gallant leading a charge on the rebel battery and rear guard about noon on the 4th instant, of which he soon afterward died. The Tenth Tennessee Cavalry had been ordered to move around to the left of the rebel position and charge them in flank, while Colonel Eifort, with the detachment of his own regiment and a portion of the Fifth Tennessee, went to charge them in front. After a sufficient time had been given the Tenth to get into position Colonel Eifort charged forward in the most gallant style, but the Tenth had failed to get into position and charged simultaneously, as was intended. The consequence was that Colonel Eifort was repulsed and driven back; and while the colonel was bravely trying to hold his men in the unequal fight, amid the enemy's guns, he was shot through the body. In this death society lost an ornament and the country a brave young officer of much promise. Inclosed I also send a copy of the report of Colonel Boone, of the One hundred and fifteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

I have the honor, major, to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. H. MILROY,

Major-General.

Major B. H. POLK,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Numbers 289.

Report of Major General James B. Steedman, U. S. Army, commanding District of the Etowah, of operations June 15-September 11.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE ETOWAH,

Chattanooga, Tenn., September 11, 1864.

SIR: Pursuant to instructions of the 4th instant from the major-general commanding Department of the Cumberland, received the 11th instant, I have the honor to report that, in obedience to orders from the major-general commanding Military Division of the Mississippi, I assumed command of the district of the Etowah on the 15th of June last. A roster of the troops of my command at that time, and stations where posted, is herewith respectfully submitted.* The main duty of my command was to keep open railroad communication with the army in the front. On the 18th of June I directed Colonel Watkins, commanding Third Brigade, First Cavalry Division then stationed at Wauhatchie, to proceed with his mounted force to La Fayette, Ga., and patrol the country in that vicinity, then much infested by guerrillas, who were annoying our communications to the front. On the 18th of June I directed Colonel Watkins, commanding Third Brigade, First Cavalry Division, then stationed at Wauhatchie, to proceed with his mounted force to La Fayette, Ga., and patrol the country in that vicinity, then much infested by guerrillas, who were annoying our communications to the front. On the 24th, at daylight, Colonel Watkins was attacked at La Fayette by rebel cavalry, some 2,000 strong, under General Pillow, who, after having been refused a surrender of the place and forces, attempted to surround and capture them. Our forces, numbering about 400, immediately took refuge in the court-house and adjacent buildings, from which they kept up a well-directed fire, and were enabled to repel every assault of the enemy. After five hours' severe fighting, in which the enemy lost heavily without having

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*Not found as an inclosure.

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