War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0418 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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About noon the regiment advanced as skirmishers in front of the brigade three miles, and found the enemy strongly intrenched on a wounded ridge beyond a small steam. Here earth-works were thrown up and the regiment went into camp. In the 18th remained in camp skirmishing with the enemy, and the mean time our artillery playing upon their position. During the night the enemy evacuated. At 10 o'clock of the 19th, with brigade, again advanced. It having rained excessively the marching was very fatiguing. After some delay succeeded in crossing Noyes' Creek, which was so much swollen by the rained excessively the marching was very fatiguing. After some delay succeeded in crossing Noyes' Creek, which was so much swollen by the rain as to carry away the bridge and cover the road. After crossing formed in line of battle on a wooded ridge to the right of the road half a mile. Moved forward a short distance and commenced building works. During the night again moved to the left and build other works on the same connected line. On the 20th again moved to the left and front and built another line of works. On the 221st was relieved by a regiment of Kimball's brigade, Fourth Corps, and soon after the regiment, with brigade, moved forward half a mile and again threw up works.

BATTLE OF KOLB'S FARM.

On the 22nd of June the regiment was ordered forward with brigade. After moving half a mile the enemy was found in strong position on the high ridge. The regiment was formed in line of battle in reserve. The lines in front advanced and after a sharp resistance the enemy fell back. In this movement, the left flank being exposed, the regiment, with Nineteenth Michigan, was moved up to cover that flank and fill the gap between the right of the Fourth Corps and the left of the advanced line. Here the regiment for a short time was sharply engaged, and exposed at same time to an enfilading fire, losing a number of men wounded. About 5 p. m. the regiment, with brigade, was relieved by troops [from] Kimball's brigade, Fourth Army Corps, and moved to the right and took position to the rear of First Division to re-enforce that division, which was hotly engaged. On arriving here the regiment rested for four hours and again advanced to the immediately rear of Knipe's brigade.

On the 23rd the regiment, with brigade, advanced at 9 o'clock and moved to right and east on the Powder Springs and Marietta road past Scribner's Female Institute. Took position on the left of the road in front, within musket range of the enemy's works. Works were thrown up. This was at a point three miles west of Marietta and not far from the very formidable works of the enemy near the base of Kenesaw Mountain. The regiment of the First Brigade and encamped a short distance in rear. During 27th, 28th, and 29th remained in same camp. During this time the regiment was engaged daily in skirmishing with the enemy, and losing a number in wounded. Here Lieutenant Mortimer Denny, Company G, was badly wounded, since died, and in him the regiment lost on of its most thorough, gentlemanly, and bravest officers. On the 30th of June the regiment was relieved by a regiment of the First Brigade and moved farther to the rear, where it went into camp, remaining here until the 3rd day of July. The men in the mean time were engaged in washing their clothes and cleaning up equipments. On the 3rd of July, at 2 o'clock, the enemy evacuated the works around Kenesaw Mountain and Marietta. Early in the