War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0291

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Page 291
Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC. - ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.

One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers threw up a line of earth-works and rested for the night. July 20, about 2 p.m. the regiment marched from behind the works thrown up the night previous to the front and right of their position several hundred yards. The brigade was formed in column, closed in mass by regiments, and was in position to support the First and Second Brigades of the division, and resting. At this time Captain Spaulding with a large detail from the regiment, which had been skirmishing all day with the enemy, having been relieved, joined the command. While in this position the enemy, advancing in heavy columns massed, suddenly and fiercely attacked the First and Second Brigades, which formed the advanced line of the division, and were a considerable [distance] in advance of the Third Brigade. By their overwhelming numbers and impetuous attack they forced the advanced line to retire in great disorder toward and upon the Third Brigade, which the colonel commanding was now deploying and advancing into position. This regiment, commanded by Colonel Hammerstein was ordered to deploy on the right of the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, but before they had fallen in and were prepared so to do, the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania had already started. The regiment moved forward, but owing to the dense undergrowth and rough nature of the ground, the advance was rendered very difficult and the line irregular, besides an almost utter inability to keep in view the other regiments of the brigade. The One hundred and forty-ninth New York Volunteers had, by reason of the aforesaid difficulties, got some distance in advance of the One hundred and second, when suddenly the enemy appeared both in our front and on our right flank and commenced a rapid and galling fire upon our men. Attacked thus and having the difficulties of the ground to encounter, and confused by the disorderly retreat of the First and Second Brigades, this regiment in common with the others broke and also retired in confusion from the enemy, who kept steadily advancing in great numbers. In the mean time Bundy's battery (Thirteenth New York) which was considerably in advance and on the left of the brigade, and the Sixtieth New York Veteran Volunteers and Twenty-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, which had been placed in position on the left and at right angles to the line of battle of the brigade in support of the battery, by their steady and destructive fire upon the flank of the advancing enemy checked his advance, and taking advantage of this, the brigade was rallied and made good their stand against greatly superior numbers, and finally forced back the enemy's columns in disorder, compelling him to quit the field, leaving many of his dead and wounded in our hands and also leaving us possession of the field. Our loss in this battle was severe, amounting to 55 killed, wounded, and missing. A new line was formed after dark; works hastily erected, and behind these the regiment remained until July 22, when, with the brigade, it advanced about four miles and came up with the enemy in front of his well-constructed works before Atlanta. Earth-works were rapidly constructed on our part and at night we bivouacked within cannon shot of the Gate City. July 23, strengthened the works; toward the afternoon marched to the left a short distance and relieved, two regiments of the Third Division, we occupying their works. Remained here under fire of the enemy in our front, which resulted in no damage, until



Page 291
Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC. - ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.