War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0276 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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Report of casualties in Third Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, for the campaign ending September 2, 1864.

Severely Slightly

Killed. wounded. wounded. Missing.

Regiment. Off Men Off Men Off Men Off Men Aggre

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rs rs rs rs

60th New 1 5 2 41 2 22 - 1 74

York

Veteran

Volunteers

78th New - 1 2 12 - 7 - 1 23

York

Veteran

Volunteers

102nd New - 16 3 41 - 26 1 24 111

York

Veteran

Volunteers

137th New - 10 3 40 2 23 - 2 80

York

Volunteers

149th New 2 30 2 80 2 52 - 10 178

York

Volunteers

29th - 20 1 88 4 53 - 5 171

Pennsylvani

a Veteran

Volunteers

111th 3 30 7 68 2 55 3 42 210

Pennsylvani

a Veteran

Volunteers

Total. 6 112 20 370 12 238 4 85 847

Comparative report of effective force.

Effective force May 2, 1864................................ 2,376

Recruits received during campaign.......................... 286

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2,662

Effective force September 2, 1864.......................... 1,442

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Decrease in effective force................................ 1,220

Numbers 235.

Reports of Colonel George A. Cobham, jr., One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations May 15-June 2.

HDQRS. THIRD Brigadier, SECOND DIV., 20TH ARMY CORPS,

Near Cassville, Ga., May 21, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to transmit the following report of the part taken by my command in the engagement at Resaca, Ga., on the 15th instant. I also inclose reports of the regimental commanders of the part taken by their respective regiments:

At 10 a.m. of the 15th the brigade received orders to move from its position on the extreme left of the line to a position near the Dalton, road, and was there massed in column of regiments in a ravine nearly parallel to the road and but a short distance from it. About 12 m. the brigade was ordered forward by Colonel Ireland, under direction of General Geary, and advanced up the hill, changing direction to the right. I advanced with my own regiment, the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers crossed the Dalton road, and changing direction to the right, ascended the hill in front while a desultory firing was kept up the enemy's sharpshooters, and drew my regiment up in line on the summit. Here I was ordered by Major-General Hooker, commanding Twentieth Corps, to advance to the summit of the opposite ridge, on which the enemy had a battery in position and a strong line of breast-works and hold the position if possible. I immediately moved my line forward, down the hill, across the intervening plain, and up the opposite ridge. The ground for the whole distance of about half a mile was thickly covered with timber and brush and exposed to the enemy's fire. On reaching the summit we were met by a terrible fire from the rebel breast-works and also from sharpshooters in the trees.