War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0271 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC. - ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.

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mishers of the enemy were encountered in an open field, protected by rifle-pits. McGill's battery was placed in position, supported by the One hundred and thirty-seventh New York Volunteers, and opened fire upon the enemy. The Sixtieth and One hundred and second New York Volunteers, with the Twenty-ninth and One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, all under command of Colonel George A. Cobham, One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, were, by the direction of General Hooker, moved across a small stream on our right flank, and, with the Sixtieth New York Volunteers were, by the direction of General Hooker, moved across a small stream on our right flank, and, with the Sixtieth New York Volunteers deployed as skirmishers, advanced to ascertain the enemy's position. The Seventy-eighth and One hundred and forty-ninth New York Volunteers at the same time moved up the stream without crossing. A strong line of skirmishers in rifle-pits was developed, crossing the Marietta road almost at right angles and skirting the edge of the woods in front of Colonel Cobham's detachment. Breast-works were constructed during the night and a connection formed on the right with Third Division. At 10 a.m. the next day, 20th, the brigade was relieved by the Second Bridge, Colonel Jones commanding, and allowed to remain in reserve until 5 p.m., when it was ordered to move to the right, and bivouacked about a mile from the position vacated. At 8 a.m. June 21, by direction of General Geary, two regiments (the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers and One hundred and thirty-seventh New York Volunteers), under command of Colonel Cobham,, were sent out on a reconnaissance under the direction of Captain Forbes, division inspector. The remainder of the brigade moved to the right at 9.30 a.m. forming on the right of First Brigade and throwing up very heavy works. The two regiments sent with Captain Forbes remained out during the day and night, and at daylight next morning (22d) advanced and drove the enemy from an important hill about half a mile in front of our works. At 9 a.m. the remainder of the brigade moved out to their support and built strong breast-works on the commanding hill just taken by the two regiments above mentioned. The Second Brigade moved up on our right and the First Brigade on our left. The One hundred and thirty-seventh New York Volunteers and the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers were placed in reserve. At 5 p.m. the enemy assaulted the First Division on the right of the Second Brigade, and that brigade was ordered to the right to fill a gap existing between the right of the Second Division and the left of the First Division and the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers and One hundred and thirty-seventh New York Volunteers, then in reserve, were ordered up to occupy the partially completed works vacated by the Second Brigade, which were at once finished and strengthened. The line of intrenchments was thus rendered continuous, and occupied without incident until the morning of June 27. At 8 a.m. June 27, in obedience to orders from General Geary, the brigade was formed in three lines, partially in the rear and to the right of the Second Brigade, the regiments being arranged in the following order from right to left: First line, Seventy-eighth and One hundred and thirty-seventh New York Volunteers; second line. Twenty-ninth and One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers; third line, One hundred and second and One hundred and forty-ninth New York Volunteers, with Sixtieth New York Volunteers in reserve. In this order, simultaneously with movements on our left we advanced over the works, driving the rebel