War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0254 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

Search Civil War Official Records

companies had to form the advanced guard; the march was directed toward Pea Vine Church, a distance of seven miles, where the regiment encamped for the night. May 7, the regiment started at 5 a.m.; had to follow the Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers; the march was directed toward Mitchell's Tannery, and from there to Gordon's Springs, near which the regiment encamped, a distance of twelve miles; the regiment had also to lead the ammunition train over a high ridge. May 8, at about 10 a.m. when the regiment was still encamped near Gordon's Springs, orders were received to march at once and to follow the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, also to detach two officers and sixty enlisted men to the ammunition, train and provost guard, so that the regiment mustered only 135 muskets; the march was directed toward Mill Creek, Ga; when arrived there, at once several shots were heard and our advance guard had to skirmish with some rebel sharpshooters; line of battle was formed. On the right of the regiment was the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, and on the left the One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, and then the whole line advanced with skirmishers in front toward Rocky Face Ridge. The slope of the ridge on which the regiment advanced was the steepest and very rocky, so that the men had party one by one to climb up till it reached the largest rocks, then it became impossible for three-fourths of the regiment to advance farther, although it was several times tried to charge with the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers together. The other fourth of the regiment, however, went around the slope with the One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers and charged with them up to the mountain, but they also failed to reach the very summit on account of large rocks and the heavy fire of the enemy. The rebel sharpshooters kept up all the time a very lively fire; however the regiment maintained its position till after sundown, at about 7.30 p.m. when the regiment received orders to fall back toward the road and to rally again. This was done without pursuit; for the night the regiment was formed in line of battle fronting Mill Creek and camped there. The loss in the fight from the Twenty-seventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers was 1 man killed, 3 men severely wounded, and 3 men slightly wounded. May 9, the regiment changed camp and remained in the wood during the day. At about 9.30 p.m the regiment was ordered to march to division headquarters and to build rifle-pits there between the One hundred and eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, on the left, and the One hundred and second New York Volunteers, on the right, fronting toward Rocky Face Ridge. May 10, the regiment remained on the same place. May 12, the regiment marched toward Snake [Creek] Gap, a distance of fourteen miles, and remained there for the night. May 13, the regiment marched three miles on the road toward Resaca, Ga., where heavy firing was heard. The brigade formed several lines, the regiment being in the front line; at sundown we had to change position and had to occupy the rifle-pits built by the First Division of the corps. On the right of the rifle-pits built by the First Division of the corps. On the right of the regiment was the Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, on the left the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York. During the whole night the regiment remained there. May 14, during the day the regiment had still the same position, but at sundown the Second Bridge had to occupy the same upon heretofore occupied by the whole division, and the regiment, had accord-