War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0247 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.

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without exposing themselves, deliberately pick off our men as they toiled up the almost inaccessible side of the hill. After a short halt to recover somewhat their breath and divest themselves of superfluous garments, the One hundred and fifty-fourth, with the Seventy-third Pennsylvania on their left, moved straight up the hill, unchecked by the fearful shower of balls to which they were exposed. At length they reached the foot of the palisades which crown the summit, and under their partial cover halted to rest a moment where they attempted the fearful exploit of mounting to the summit. Meanwhile the Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania and One hundred and thirty-fourth New York, on their right, had obliqued to the right, keeping partially covered by a false ridge which ran obliquely up the mountain, and a wide space was thus opened on our right and we were subjected to a flank fire much more deadly than that in front. At length the order was given to charge the precipice in our front, and most of our men succeeded in gaining a footing upon the top of the cliff. Our colors were firmly planted upon the summit, when the color bearer was shot through the head and instantly killed. Two others in succession shared the same fate as they attempted to seize the sacred emblem. The third was more fortunate and saved the colors. Our occupation of the crest was but momentary. Seeing the hopelessness (with the force that was there) of holding the position, Colonel Jones ordered a retreat, and the regiment fell back to the foot of the hill, having suffered a loss of 8 men killed, 42 wounded, and 6 missing, as per schedule hereunto annexed.* After getting our men together again, and helping off as far as we could our wounded, we reformed our lines and remained on the side of the mountain a little to the right of the point of our ascent until dark, when, in obedience to orders from Colonel Buschbeck, we withdrew, and at 10 p. m. bivouacked near the point of our first formation of the line of battle. Colonel Jones was so seriously injured by a fall from the cliffs that he was sent to the rear, and the command devolved upon Lieutenant Colonel D. B. Allen. May 9, did not march, but merely charged camp to a more suitable location. In the evening we were moved back and placed in position in front of division headquarters, which we intrenched during the night, and where we remained until the morning of the 12th. May 12, marched to Snake Creek Gap, through which we passed, and bivouacked near its eastern terminus. May 13, were under arms at daylight, but owing to the number of troops upon the road we did not move until nearly 8 a. m., and then but a short distance, when we were obliged to halt by the roadside for the passage of other troops; marched toward Resaca about two miles, then turned to the left and took position behind some hastily constructed defenses, facing toward Dalton. May 14, remained in position until about 11 p. m., when we fell in and marched by our left to the west and north, and at 4 a. m. of the 15th halted and enjoyed a short rest. May 15, did not move until about 10 a. m., when we marched to our right a short distance, then formed a line of battle and advanced to drive the enemy from a range of hills in our front. In this we were successful, the enemy retiring before us until nearly night, when they made a stand behind a strong line of works upon a hill higher than the rest. Our brigade was considerably scattered in consequence of the great number of troops who were forced to maneuver

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* The schedules herein mentioned are nominal lists (omitted).

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