War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0243 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.

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over Lookout Mountain, halting at dark about six miles from the old camp, and bivouacked for the night. On the morning of the 5th marched at 8 a. m. and halted and bivouacked for the night at 7 p. m. Marched at daylight on the 6th, and went into camp at 6 p. m. On the 7th marched at 5 a. m.; passed Gordon's Mills, and crossed Taylor's Ridge and went into camp for the night at 8 p. m. Marched at 11 a. m. on the 8th toward Dug Gap. Arriving within about half a mile of the mountain, skirmishers were thrown out, and the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers formed line of battle and advanced to the base of the mountain. Resting there for a few minutes, the regiment again pushed forward. Frequent halts were necessary on account of the difficulties of the ascent. Arriving near the crest of the mountain, in accordance with orders received from brigade commander, the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers charged the enemy. Both officers and men responded with alacrity, pressing forward with cheers, and gained the crest, but the enemy being strongly intrenched, and in large numbers, the regiment was forced to retire. Forming again within about 100 yards of the crest, the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers again charged the crest, but were again forced back to the ledge of rocks near the crest. Halting there for a short line, and being re-enforced by four companies of the Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, in accordance with orders, another assault was made, but the enemy having received re-enforcements it was found impossible to take the position. The regiment then fell back to the ledge of rocks, and a desultory fire was kept up until 7 p. m., when, in accordance with orders from the brigade commander, the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers withdrew, under fire from Knap's (Pennsylvania) battery, to the foot of the mountain, and soon after went into camp for the night. At 7 a. m. on the 9th the regiment went on picket, and remained there until 5 p. m. of the 10th, when they were relieved by the Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, and joined the brigade and went into camp. On the 11th the regiment went on picket, relieving the Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, and remained there until 3 p. m. of the 12th, when they were relieved by a portion of General McCook's cavalry command. Joined the brigade and marched at 4 p. m.; passed through Snake Creek Gap, and halted at 8 p. m. and bivouacked for the night. On the morning of the 13th moved forward and occupied a line of works until 11 p. m. of the 14th, at which time we moved to the left, and took position in earth-works. At 11 a. m. of the 15th the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers moved forward from the works and advanced in line, passing over three lines of battle, charged the enemy, and took position on a small ridge and fortified. Were relieved at dark, and retired to second line of works, where we remained for the night. On the 16th marched at daylight; crossed the Oostenaula River, and bivouacked for the night at Bryant's Ferry. Marched at 1 p. m. on the 17th; halted for the night at 7 p. m. On the morning of the 18th marched at 4 a. m.; halted at 9 p. m. and went into camp for the night. Marched at daylight on the 19th; halted at 7 p. m. and went into camp near Cassville, Ga. Remained in camp the 20th, 21st and 22d. Marched at 7 a. m. on the 23d; crossed the Etowah River and camped for the night at 6 p. m. On the 24th marched at daylight; halted for the night at 7 p. m. Marched at 7 a. m. of the