War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0235 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.

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threw up breast-works, agreeable to orders received, and remained in this position until June 8, when Colonel Lockman again assumed command of the regiment. June 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, in the same position taken up by the regiment on the 7th of June. Moved at 1 p. m., and took position in rear of our division. On the 15th of June orders to move were received at 11 a. m.; while en route to the position assigned our brigade, I was detailed as division field officer of the day, and the command of the regiment devolved upon Captain C. H. Southworth, senior officer. About 3 p. m., line having been formed, we moved forward and drove in the enemy's skirmishers. At 5 p. m. another advance was made, and the enemy was driven to his works. I rejoined the regiment at 8 p. m. and ordered the men to build a breast-works of logs, which was commenced at once, the men working zealously. A few spades and picks were procured, and a slight work was finished before daylight of the 16th of June, when we discovered that we were less than 250 yards from the enemy's works, which were of formidable strength, and from which they fired upon my men with deadly effect. The troops on the right of my regiment having been withdrawn during the night, it left the right flank of my regiment exposed to an enfilading fire of the enemy's skirmishers and main line. I sent out a party to drive them off, but out of 7 who started but 1 escaped, the others being either killed or wounded. I then requested Colonel Ireland to advance his line of skirmishers on a line with my men, which he did promptly, and by a united effort the line of the enemy's skirmishers was thrown back. The Thirty-third New Jersey rendered me very efficient assistance, and, in a measure, the success of the movement is due to them. The enemy still kept up a fire from their main works, and from the formation of the ground it enfiladed my line, and all the troops being withdrawn made a fair mark of the regiment. I requested to be withdrawn, but was informed by Colonel Jones, commanding brigade, that he had received position orders to hold our position at all hazards, and that he had ordered the rest of the brigade to assist. The Thirty-third New Jersey and my command were posted. We held the position during the day, and at 9 p. m. were relieved by the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, Colonel Jackson. My loss this day was 26 killed and wounded, and for 15th and 16th of June, 40* out of 134, the number the regiment went into action with. The rebels retreated during the night of the 16th, and morning of the 17th a general advance was made, and the rebel line found strongly intrenched about three miles from the position evacuated by them the previous night. We built breast-works and occupied them during the 18th, our artillery firing with good effect upon the enemy's works. June 19, the rebels having falling back during the night of the 18th, we pursued and found them strongly intrenched about three miles from their former position. June 20, brigade in reserve until 11 a. m., when we relieved Third Brigade; my regiment was assigned the left of the line. Orders received to be ready to move, as we were to be relieved by the Fourth Corps. June 21, Fourth Corps relieved us at 8 a. m.; moved about two miles to the right, our brigade being next the First Division on the right, Third Brigade of our division left, my regiment connecting with Third Brigade on left and One hundred and fifty-fourth New York on the right, intrenched. June 22, advance our line about one mile. The

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* Or 10 men killed, 1 officer and 29 men wounded.

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