War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0218 Chapter L. THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN.

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the brigade moved forward and was assigned a position in rear of the division. At 10 a. m. the command was ordered to proceed against the enemy, who occupied a strong position on the crest of several hills in well-constructed and formidable rifle-pits. About 1.30 p. m. formed in three lines of battle and continued to advance, the Third Division leading; soon drove the enemy from their first three lines of works, after which the column halted and reformed at the base of the third hill-the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, and One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers forming the first line; the One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and Seventy-third Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers holding the line of works immediately in rear. The four regiments mentioned above received orders direct from Major-General Hooker to advance and take a battery in their front. Colonel J. T. Lockman, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, being the senior officer, assumed command of that portion of the brigade. The detachment moved forward over a line of breast-works from which the enemy had been driven, and over the works and down the slope. The men charged up the hill under a severe enfilading fire, the Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers planting their colors on the counterscarp of the ditch, and in connection with the other regiments driving the rebel gunners from their works, and by an unceasing fire prevented their return, thus rendering useless the artillery there in position. I respectfully refer you to the report of Colonel J. T. Lockman for further information in regard to the movements of these four regiments. Colonel Cobham, commanding Third Brigade, having been placed in command of the line by order of Major-General Hooker, these regiments remained with him till late in the evening. The One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and Seventy-third Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers remained in their previous position till about 9 p. m., when they were sent out to relieve troops in the front and to assist in removing four pieces of artillery which had been commanded by our troops since the assault. The regiments remained chiefly engaged at this work and throwing up rifle-pits until the desired object had been obtained, when the whole brigade took position in the line of breast-works held previously, they having been relieved by other troops. It is with deep sorrow that I announce the death of Lieutenant Colonel Edward F. Lloyd, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, who fell mortally wounded at the head of his command.

May 16, the enemy having retreated during the night, the brigade moved at 8 a. m., fording the Coosawattee River. The One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers were here detached to proceed to Field's Ferry to procure boats to enable the brigade to cross the Coosawattee River, which being done, the command crossed at Bryant's Ferry, bivouacking at Bryant's farm. May 17, marched at 1 p. m. and encamped at Peters' farm at the forks of the Calhoun and Adairsville roads. May 18, moved at 5 a. m., halting for the First Division to pass, and bivouacked on the Kingston road. May 19, moved at 6.15 a. m. in the direction of Cassville, Ga., crossing Two-Run Creek, and went into camp about two miles from that place, where the brigade remained on the 20th, 21st, and 22nd instant. Here the Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers,