War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0210 Chapter L. THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN.

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of the 15th. The position occupied by the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers was greatly exposed. The natural inaptness of this part of the line for defense could not be overcome by any artificial means that we could then avail ourselves of, and the loss of this regiment was very severe. Indeed, the losses of all the regiments in the brigade attest how exposed was the position, and how stubbornly and gallantry it was maintained, and reflects great credit upon the officers and men of the command. Captain F. L. Gimber, commanding the One hundred and ninth Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, was severely wounded in the early part of the engagement while gallantly directing the movements of his regiment, but continued with his command until borne down by loss of blood and physical exhaustion. Major C. C. Cresson, Seventy-third Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteers, was painfully wounded during the action, but continued in command of his regiment during the two days in which it was under fire. Captain Allanson Crosby, One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, was mortally wounded and died on the 7th of July. Lieutenant William H. Cochrane, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, was killed instantly while directing a working party in front of the works. These were gallant and exemplary officers, brave and intelligent in the discharge of their duties, prompt to yield or enforce obedience. The army sustains in their death a heavy loss. To their friends I tender my most heartfelt sympathy, and to their respective States the assurance that the commissions of these officers were not unworthily bestowed. They have each sacrificed to the common cause a noble and devoted officer, and added luster to the name of the American soldier. A complete list of the casualties in the brigade is attached hereto, marked Schedule A,* making a part of this report. To Captain W. H. Lambert, acting aide-de-camp, and Captain W. T. Forbes, acting assistant inspector-general, of the division staff, I tender my thanks for the brave and intelligent manner in which they delivered to me the orders and instructions of the division commander, and remained with me during their execution, while the brigade was under the severest fire, and respectfully commend them to the general commanding the division. At daybreak on the 17th, the enemy having evacuated his works in our front, the brigade was put under arms by an order given personably by the division commander, and at sunrise we occupied the works of the enemy. About 9 a. m. the brigade was again put under arms, and moved forward in column with the division on the- road. After marching about three miles the advance guard of the division encountered the cavalry covering the rear of the enemy, his main force having intrenched itself on a range of hills on the southwest bank of Mud Creek. The division now formed line of battle, the Second Brigade on the left of the division, and advanced in line toward the position of the enemy. A strong skirmish line of the enemy was developed, giving way gradually, however, before our more vigorous advance, and falling back upon the main body. Arriving on the northwest bank of the creek, under the immediate orders of the general commanding division, I took position on a range corresponding to position held by the enemy in the following order from left to right: One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers, One hundred

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* Nominal list (omitted) shows 1 officer and 38 men killed, 12 officers and 167 men wounded; total, 218.

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