War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0203 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.

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crossing Lookout Mountain, and bivouacked about one mile from Rossville. On the morning of May 5 marched at 8 a. m., passing through Rossville Gap, moving on the La Fayette road, and camped on Harrison's farm. May 6, marched at 5 a. m. and went into camp near Pea Vine Church. May 7, marched at 5 a. m., crossing Taylor's Ridge, passed through Gordon's Spring, and bivouacked in line of battle on the Rome road near Buzzard Roost. May 8, broke camp at about 11 a. m., and, pursuant to orders, moved in the direction of Mill Creek Gap, Ga., a pass in the Chattoogata Mountain. The Thirty-third New Jersey Volunteers being on picket, received orders to follow the division. The brigade moved about a mile in column, the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers as advanced guard, when, coming to a fork in the road, the One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers and Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers moved on the road to the left and the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers, One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers, and Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, taking the road to the right, each column throwing out skirmishers well in advance, proceeded about three-quarters of a mile to a place where the roads formed a junction near the open ground, across which the road runs leading to the gap. At this point they were formed in line of battle in the following order: One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers on the right, Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers on the left, Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers and One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers on the right and left center, the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers deployed as skirmishers, covering the front of the brigade, the First Brigade following at supporting distance. The line then advanced in the direction of the gap (the Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers moving on the roads a cheval) over very difficult ground, much obstructed by fences, a heavy underbrush, and the creek running at the base of the mountain. The ascent of the mountain was found very steep and arduous, requiring frequent halts to rest the men during the advance. The skirmish line of the One hundred and nineteenth New York Volunteers was strengthened by detachments from each regiment. The skirmishers were engaged in a desultory fire soon after beginning the assault, the enemy retiring until the line had reached to within 300 or 400 yards of the palisades of rock which form the ridge. Here the fire became general, engaging the whole line, the troops steadily advancing until the nature of the ground affording superior facilities for the ascent upon the extreme of the line the regiments diverged slightly to the right and left. The One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers and One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers shortly after charged up the palisades and succeeded in planting their colors on the crest of the mountain; but few only could climb at a time, and the enemy, massing their force at the several points of attack, soon dislodged the brave heroes who had actually gained the very summit. The side of the mountain being so precipitous it was impossible to reform there, and the One hundred and fifty-fourth New York Volunteers, Seventy-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and the Twenty-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers were obliged to retire some distance from the ground held by them previous to the charge. The ground occupied by the One hundred and thirty-fourth New York Volunteers being better adapted for reforming, this regiment fell back about 100 paces. After reforming, the One hundred and