War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0194 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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May 12 the regiment took up the line of march, passing through Snake Creek Gap to Sugar Valley, distant about seven miles from Resaca. At 9 a. m. May 13 we left the bivouac of the preceding night and marched to a point near Resaca and, with the brigade, formed in line covering the main road leading from Dalton to Resaca. The night was spent in constructing a line of works, connecting on the right with the Twenty- nine Ohio Volunteer Infantry and on the left with the One hundred and eleventh Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers. In this position we remained until 4 p. m. of the 14th instant, when the regiment was assigned the right of the brigade and marched toward the left of the Fourth Corps. After reaching the position designated I was ordered to the ow up a line of protecting works of logs, connecting on my right with those of the Eighty- second ohio Volunteer Infantry, of the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps, and on my left with the Seventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry. A strong line of skirmishers was thrown forward, connecting with those of the regiments on my right and left. There was no picket- firing during the night. Early on the morning of the 15th I sent forward a few men for the purpose of ascertaining the position o the enemy. It was found that they (the enemy) had moved from our immediate front toward the right of the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps. At about 9.30 a. m. we marched form the position of the preceding night to the right of the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps. The regiment was on the right of the brigade. On reaching the ravine in rear and between the right of the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps, and left of the Fourth Corps, the brigade was formed in column of battalions in rear of the Second Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, and moved to the top of the ridge fronting portions of the line of the enemy in an oblique direction, taking the fort as the basis of direction. Orders were soon after received to change directing by the right flank. This movement being executed, placed the battalion in a small ravine directly in front of the fort, with a portion of the One hundred and forty- ninth New York Volunteer Infantry in front of the right of my line and the Thirty- third Indiana Volunteer Infantry in front of the left of the line. In this position the right of the regiment rested on the Dalton road while the left made a close connection with a regiment of the First Division, Twentieth Army Corps, believed to be the Forty- sixth Pennsylvania. The battalions being closed in mass they were set in motion by the commanding officer of the brigade, under the personal superintendence of the division commander, and ordered to take the fort at all hazards. I can only say that I did not see the fort and do not think my command was within 200 yards of it when I halted, being unable to pass knowledge at the time of starting, without breaking my line and thus rendering it useless in the charge. Under orders communicated by Lieutenant Samuel Goodman, acting assistant inspector- general, First Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Army Corps, I withdrew my regiment under cover of the ridge over which we had just passed and the ere remained until ordered to relieve the Seventy- third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, of Third Division, Twentieth Army Corps, and One hundred and forty- first New York Volunteers, First Division, Twentieth Army Corps, posted in front and on the left of the line of our brigade and directly in front of the breast- works of the right of