War of the Rebellion: Serial 073 Page 0086 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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of the battery. This order was at once communicated to the regiments of my brigade, and in a moment the whole was in motion. The evolution was executed with enthusiasm and with no less precision and regularity of movement than might have been expected upon drill. Arriving at the front of the battery the Eighty-second Illinois, Sixty-first Ohio, and One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers poured a tremendous fire upon the overconfident foe. The One hundred and first Illinois was directed to move at once upon the hill on the left, now in possession of the enemy. That gallant regiment at once advanced in perfect order to the crest and drove from it the enemy's skirmishers. Meeting with such severe and unexpected resistance, the enemy at once gave way and confusedly sought his intrenchments back in the woods. The troops now bivouacked in line of battle, and remained in the position thus taken up until 12 m. of the following day. At that time I was directed by General Williams to march my brigade, following that of Brigadier-General Ruger, down the Dalton road. After proceeding about half a mile, and having entered the dense forest covering the enemy's position, I was ordered by the brigadier-general commanding division to form my brigade on the left of the road in line of battle, the regiments being in column. Butterfield's and Geary's divisions had already actively engaged the enemy, and the firing upon my right had grown severe. Upon further consultation with General Williams, I moved my brigade to the crest of the hill in front of the line then occupied, and directly it in position on the left of General Ruger's brigade, and upon the left flank of the division, and in fact the left flank of the army. My brigade was formed in two lines, the One hundred and first Illinois and the One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers, deployed, composing the first, and the Sixty-first Ohio, Eighty-second Ohio, Forty-fifth New York, and Eighty-second Illinois the second line, supporting the two regiments of General Ruger's brigade, and the two regiments of my own brigade deployed in the front line. My first line rested along the base of a slight declivity. Shortly after my brigade was thus formed, I was directed by General Williams to send a regiment to support the battery of Captain Woodbury, which had been placed in position upon a wooded hills some distance to the rear. I immediately dispatched the Forty-fifth New york Veteran Volunteers, which regiment remained with the battery until the morning of the 16th. At about 5 p. m. the enemy was discovered to be massing his troops in the forest that skirted the farther side of the open field in my front. I immediately moved the Eighty-second Ohio to the crest of the slope, and stationed it behind the breast-works immediately in ear and support of the One hundred and fiftieth New York Volunteers, of Ruger's brigade. The One hundred and first Illinois Volunteers was then deployed and formed in continuation of the line on the left of the One hundred and fiftieth New York Volunteers. The One hundred and forty-third New York Volunteers was next deployed and formed on the left of the One hundred and first Illinois. The two latter regiments were unsheltered by any species of breast-works or other obstacle to the fire of the enemy. The dispositions just described had been hardly made until the enemy boldly emerged from the woods and began the attack. He at once opened a heavy fire of musketry, which was repaid with interest. He had not advanced far into the open