War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0733 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC. - ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.

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HDQRS. THIRD DIVISION, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Jonesborough, Ga., September 7, 1864.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor submit the following report of the part performed by this division in the campaign which began with the movement of the army from Chattanooga, Tenn., in May last, and terminated with the capture of Atlanta, Ga., on the 1st instant:

On the 22nd of February this division marched from Chattanooga, together with the other two divisions of the corps, to Tunnel Hill and Buzzard Roost Gap, for the purpose of making a reconnaissance of the enemy's position in front of Dalton and having ascertained by feeling him closely for two days that his army was still there in force, strongly posted and fortified, we withdrew upon the night of the 26th to Ringgold, where this division took post, the remainder of the troops being removed to other points. From February until May the division continued to occupy that place as the extreme advance post of the army. Our pickets and those of the enemy were always in close proximity, and affairs of minor importance between them were of constant occurrence. On two occasions, reconnoitering parties of large force were sent as far as Tunnel Hill, both of which were highly successful, and chiefly useful in inspiring our cavalry with greater confidence in their superiority over that of the enemy. In each of these expeditions Brigadier-General Kilpatrick, whose division of calvary was placed under my charge, commanded the cavalry, and Colonel F. Van Derveer of the Thirty-fifth Ohio, an infantry brigade. Both of these officers displayed on these occasions the high soldierly qualities for which they are known, energy and boldness, guided by the coolest judgment. During the interval from the 1st to the 6th of May the divisions and corps of the Army of the Cumberland were concentrated about Ringgold, the Army of the Ohio taking a position on our left and the Army of the Tennessee a line of march passing to our right. My division was at that time constituted as follows:

INFANTRY.

Command. Office Men Total.

rs

First Brigade, Brigadier General

J. B. Turchin commanding:

11th Ohio Volunteers, Lieutenant 15 263 278

Colonel Ogden Street

17th Ohio Volunteers, Colonel 22 569 571

Durbin Ward

31st Ohio Volunteers, Colonel M. B. 26 583 609

Walker

89th Ohio Volunteers, Major J. H. 10 211 221

Jolly

92nd Ohio Volunteers, Colonel B. D. 13 310 323

Fearing

82nd Indiana Volunteers, Colonel 17 252 269

M. C. Hunter

19th Illinois Volunteers Lieutenant 15 239 254

Colonel A. W. Raffen

24th Illinois Volunteers, Captain 14 211 225

A. Mauff

Total 132 2,618 2,750

Second Brigade, Colonel F. Van

Derveer, 35th Ohio Volunteer

Infantry, commanding:

2nd Minnesota Volunteers, Colonel 22 380 402

J. George

35th Ohio Volunteers, Major J. L. 15 277 282

Budd

9th Ohio Volunteers, Colonel G. 20 380 400

Kammerling

87th Indiana Volunteers, Colonel N. 17 316 333

Gleason

105th Ohio Volunteers, Lieutenant 15 337 352

Colonel G. T. Perkins

101st Indiana Volunteers, Lieutenant 19 359 378

Colonel Thomas Doan

75th Indiana Volunteers, Lieutenant 23 408 431

Colonel William O'Brien

Total 131 2,457 2,588

Third Brigade, Colonel G. P. Este,

14th Ohio Volunteers, commanding:

10th Kentucky Volunteers, Colonel 23 343 368

W. H. Hays

10th Indiana Volunteers, Lieutenant 32 653 685

Colonel M. B. Taylor

14th Ohio Volunteers, Major J. W. 36 498 518

Wilson