War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0721 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC. - ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.

Search Civil War Official Records

brigade triumphantly into the city of Rome. To the valor of the Eighty-sixth Illinois belongs a large share of the honor of having wrested from the enemy a very important military point. At Rome I remained encamped with the brigade until May 24, when the whole brigade resumed its march southward toward Dallas, Ga., where it arrived May 26. From this date to June 15 nothing transpired that would be of any importance in this report. With the exception of changing position, relieving and being relieved on the skirmish line and following up the enemy, who in the mean time had fallen back a short distance, nothing occurred. On the 15th of June six companies of my regiment were deployed as skirmishers, and in advancing the lines 2 men were wounded. On the 16th of June I had 2 more men wounded on the skirmish line. Nothing very important occurred until June 19. The rebels fell back to Kenesaw Mountain, as usual. Our brigade followed them up. On the 21st and 22nd of June six companies of my regiment were deployed as skirmishers; 1 enlisted man was killed and 2 wounded; also, 1 man was wounded in quarters on the 22nd by a shell.

On the 25th of June I moved with the brigade to the right about three miles and remained in camp until the 27th of June. Early on this morning I received orders to be ready to move at sunrise, leaving camp and garrison equipage behind. A charge on the rebel center had been ordered. At about 8 a.m. our gallant and brave colonel (Dan. McCook) formed his brigade, my regiment in the second line. The signal guns soon pealed forth their thunder, and in a moment thousands of brave colonel (Dan. McCook) formed his brigade, my regiment in the second line. The signal guns soon pealed forth their thunder, and in a moment thousands of brave soldiers stood ready to advance on the traitorous foe. The charge was gallantly led, but the works proved too strong to be carried. In this charge my regiment lost 4 commissioned officers wounded (Captain Frank Hitchock, Company D; Edward Vanantwerp, Company E (since dead); Lieutenant Samuel T. Rogers (A), and Lieutenant and Adjt. L. J. Dawdy, wounded and captured), 27 enlisted men killed 56 wounded, and 11 captured, all wounded except 3. But notwithstanding the rebel works were not carried, the charging column was not repulsed, for it maintained the position gained and fortified from twenty-five to sixty yards from the rebel works. My regiment with the brigade, remained within twenty-five yards of the rebel works, keeping up an incessant fire until they fell back, on the night of July 2. During the six days we lay so close to the rebel works my regiment lost additional 2 enlisted men killed and 8 wounded. My regiment again moved on with the victorious army after the retreating foe until July 10. He had retreated across the Chattahoochee River. Three companies were deployed as skirmishers in pursuing the enemy on the 10th; 1 enlisted man was wounded. I remained with the brigade on the north side of the Chattahoochee River doing picket and other duties till the 18th, when we moved to the south side of the river to within about one mile of Peach Tree Creek. On the 19th of July my regiment troop part in a brisk engagement on Peach Tree Creek, by which we gained a very important position. Casualties, 1 commissioned officer wounded (Lieutenant William D. Faulkner, Company D), 4 enlisted men killed and 5 wounded. On the 22d, the rebels having again retreated the army followed them up in front of Atlanta. From this date until the 28th the regiment was engaged in nothing except the usual routine of a campaign such as picketing, &c.

On July 28 it took part with the division in an important reconnaissance on the extreme right of our line, my regiment having four

46 R R-VOL XXXVIII, PT I