War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0701 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC. - ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.

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deployed as skirmishers in front of the mouth of the Roost. After driving in the skirmishers of the enemy, about 4 o'clock in the afternoon, with four companies of the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio, namely, Company I, Captain Robinson; B, Captain Clason; G, Captain Patrick, and H, Captain Spaulding; two companies of the One hundred and thirteenth Ohio, two companies of the One hundred and thirteenth Ohio, two companies of the Seventy-eighth Illinois, under charge of Major Green, and one company of the Thirty-fourth Illinois, I charged, and carried the mouth of Buzzard Roost Gap. Company A, of the Thirty-fourth Illinois, at the same time carried the hill on the right of the railroad and immediately south of the gap, a gallant act, for which the company and its commander deserve special mention. On our advance to the mouth of the gap the enemy withdrew to his trenches and earthworks beyond, making the capture an easy one. In the advance Private Alexander Gandy, of Company I, was wounded. We lay at the mouth of Buzzard Roost Gap until the morning of May 12, 1864, when we moved to the right toward Snake Creek Gap; reached the mouth of Snake Creek Gap about dark and halted for supper. We marched all night passed through the gap, and arrived next morning in Sugar Valley. During the afternoon we moved to the front leaving all knapsacks and baggage in the valley, and did picket duty for the Second Division, which was massed in front of the enemy's intrenched position at Resaca. On the 14th, at the battle of Resaca, the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio was in the second line and was not engaged. During the engagement Private James F, Lint, of Company F, was wounded. Early on the evening of the 14th we withdrew to the rear, drew two days' rations, and took up a position on the right of the front line, which we intrenched close up to the enemy's lines. During the night of the 15th the enemy retreated across the Coosa River. On the morning of the 16th we marched back to Sugar Valley for knapsacks and baggage, and drew two days' additional rations, and at 2 p.m. took up the line of march for Rome, the expedition consisting of the Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, under command of General Jefferson C. Davis. Although the weather was very warm and the men were much fatigued and worn out, we reached Rome, a distance of thirty-two miles from Sugar Valley, and drove in the enemy's skirmishers by 3 o'clock on the afternoon of the 17th. On the afternoon of the 17th, after having driven the enemy into his earth-works he sallied out and charged us, making an energetic effort to drive us back. He was repulsed and driven back, with but slight loss to us, but heavy loss to himself. The One hundred and twenty-first Ohio was posted to cover the artillery, and had no casualties. It was now night, and nothing more could be accomplished for the darkness. During the night out entire line was intrenched. Early on the morning of the 18th Captain Clason, of Company B, who was in charge of the brigade picket-line notified me that the enemy had left and that he was occupying the enemy's works with the skirmishers of the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio. I sent the information to Colonel Mitchell, commanding the brigade, who sent me an order during the day, hereunto attached, and marked A*, complimenting the regiment and Captain Clason for being first inside the enemy's breast-works at Rome, Ga. The enemy, consisting of General French's division of infantry and a brigade of Texas cavalry, retreated across the Etowah and Oostenaula, burning the bridges over both streams. In addition to 6 pieces of artillery captured here, we also secured a

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*Not found.

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