War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0580 THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN. Chapter L.

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three lines of rebel rifle-pits and capturing a large number of prisoners, 300 of them being credited to my command. A large number of prisoners were sent to the rear without a guard, not having men to spare, by my orders, and were taken up, I have been told, by General Carlin's brigade, which was undoubtedly credited with the number thus taken up. General Carlin's brigade, however, was not actually engaged and did not, I am sure, capture a single prisoner. This assault was most successful and brilliant, and due credit should be given to whom it was mainly owing, viz, the Eighteenth and Fifteenth Regulars. Loss during August, 1864: Commissioned officers-wounded, 2. Enlisted men-wounded, 31; killed, 7; missing, 4. Total, 44.

September 1, the detachment, as a portion of the regular brigade, was most actively engaged with the enemy at the battle of Jonesborough, Ga. We assaulted the enemy's intrenched position in the edge of woods, moving in line of battle through an open, difficult swamp, across an open field, under the severest artillery and musketry fire, flank and front. It became necessary to reform the line after crossing the swamp, and, finding it almost impossible to get my men forward through the fire, I deemed it necessary to give them the encouragement of my example (as indeed I had previously done, especially on the 7th of August), and so rode in front of my colors, and caused them to be successfully planted on the enemy's works, jumping my horse over them at the time they were filled with the enemy, being the first man of our army over the enemy's works. I was almost instantly struck from my horse inside of the enemy's works, while cheering on my men, being severely wounded by shell and bullet. I, however, held the works and retained command for some minutes, until I was taken to the rear in a semi-conscious state. The detachment lost in this battle: Commissioned officers-wounded, 3. Enlisted men-wounded, 30; killed, 10; missing, 7. Total, 50. A large number of prisoners were also captured by the Eighteenth Regulars in this battle. The casualties in this detachment during the Atlanta campaign, from May 2, 1864, to September 2, 1864, were as follows: Commissioned officers-wounded, 10. Enlisted men-wounded, 166; killed, 38; missing, 17. Total, 231.

I should be derelict in my duty did I not most earnestly recommend for brevets the following meritorious and gallant officers for distinguished bravery and conduct on the field of battle, viz: Captain G. W. Smith, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for good conduct and gallantry on the 4th of July, 1864; Captain R. B. Hull, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for gallantry on the 7th of August, 1864; the same for great gallantry on the 1st of September, 1864; Captain W. J. Fetterman, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for good conduct and gallantry on the 4th of July, 1864; Captain Ansel B. Denton, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for good conduct and gallantry on the 4th of July, 1864; Captain Anson Mills, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for gallantry and skill on the 4th of July, 1864; Captain A. S. Burt, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for gallantry on the 1st September, 1864; First Lieutenant Thomas B. Burrowes, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for gallantry on the 7th of August, 1864; the same for gallantry on the 1st of September, 1864, when he was severely wounded; First Lieutenant James Powell, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for gallantry on the 4th of July, 1864; the same for great gallantry on the 7th of August, 1864; the same for great gallantry on the 1st of September, 1864, when he was se-