War of the Rebellion: Serial 072 Page 0483 Chapter L. REPORTS, ETC.-ARMY OF THE CUMBERLAND.

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First Illinois Light Artillery, and placed them in position so as to enfilade the enemy's line for nearly a mile. June 19, the enemy having evacuated their line, the batteries marched with their divisions to a small ridge in front of Kenesaw Mountain. By General Howard's order Battery A, First Ohio; Bridge's Battery, Illinois Light Artillery; Sixth Ohio Light Battery; Fifth Indiana Light Battery; Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Light Battery, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, were placed in position and engaged in driving the enemy to Kenesaw Mountain. June 20, by command of Brigadier-General Brannan, chief of artillery, Department of the Cumberland, at 2 p.m. the artillery of the corps concentrated their fire upon the right of Kenesaw Mountain, silencing the enemy's batteries at that point. The batteries of the Second Division were relieved at dusk by the Fourteenth Army Corps, and marched with their division two miles to the right of their former position. June 21, four guns of Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, and four guns, of Sixth Ohio Light Battery, and Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, were placed in position in General Wood's front line, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, in general Newton's left front, all bearing upon two rebel batteries in General Wood's left and General Stanley's right front, which were doing much damage to each of the last-named divisions. By Major-General Howard's order these batteries opened upon the two rebel batteries and the advance line of the enemy while Colonel Kirby's brigade, of General Stanley's division, secured a position in advance of the one then occupied. Major-General Howard pronounced the firing the most accurate and effective he ever witnessed. June 22, General Howard having received a communication from Major-General Hooker that the enemy was pressing him and requesting assistance, the Fifth Indiana Light Battery and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Light Battery marched with Major-General Butterfield's division, Twentieth Army corps. Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, was placed in position in open field on right of Marietta road. June 23, in accordance with orders from Major-General Howard, all the artillery of the corps was placed in position, and at 4 p.m. opened fire for twenty minutes upon the enemy's batteries and lines, after which General Wood's division made a feint and General Stanley's division advanced and occupied an advance ridge. In accordance with orders received from Brigadier-General Brannan, there was no more artillery firing until June 26, on account of the small supply of ammunition. Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, was placed in park in rear of the Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Battery. June 27, by order of Major-General Howard, all the batteries of the corps opened fire upon the enemy for fifteen minutes at 8 a.m., after which the corps charged the enemy's works, led by General Newton's division, supported by General Wood's division.

July 1, in accordance with orders received from Major-General Thomas, the artillery of the corps opened fire upon the enemy at 6 p.m., and resumed firing one-half hour at 6 a.m. July 2. July 3, the enemy having evacuated Kenesaw Mountain, the batteries marched with their divisions through Marietta to Neal Dow Station, where the Fifth Indiana and Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania Batteries were placed in position on the left of the railroad and engaged the enemy. July 4, the Fifth Indiana Light Battery, Twenty-sixth Penn-